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Last updated on April 23, 2014 at 1:22 EDT

Latest Antipredator adaptation Stories

Is It Better To Be Social Or Stinky In Thwarting A Predatory Attack?
2014-02-11 05:59:04

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Skunks do it best when halting a predator in its tracks, unleashing a noxious stream of urine that can send the most lethal of hunters in the opposite direction. Other animals of the same group tend to rely on strong social bonds to thwart impending attacks. But why do some animals use noxious scents while others use strong social groups to defend against predation? To better answer this question, Theodore Stankowich, of...

2012-10-01 12:09:50

Scientists at the University of Rhode Island's Graduate School of Oceanography have made the first observation of a predator avoidance behavior by a species of phytoplankton, a microscopic marine plant. Susanne Menden-Deuer, associate professor of oceanography, and doctoral student Elizabeth Harvey made the unexpected observation while studying the interactions between phytoplankton and zooplankton. Their discovery will be published in the September 28 issue of the journal PLOS ONE. "It...

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2009-03-26 10:09:38

University of Michigan ecologists and their colleagues have answered a question that has puzzled biologists for more than a century: What is the main factor that determines a lizard's ability to shed its tail when predators attack? The answer, in a word: Venom. Tail-shedding, known to scientists as caudal autotomy, is a common anti-predator defense among lizards. When attacked, many lizards jettison the wriggling appendage and flee. The predator often feasts on the tail while the lucky lizard...