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Latest Antiretroviral drug Stories

2012-05-17 12:31:32

Reformulated gel could serve as an anti-HIV product for both vagina and rectum A change in the formulation of tenofovir gel, an anti-HIV gel developed for vaginal use, may make it safer to use in the rectum, suggests a study published online this week in the Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. In laboratory tests of rectal tissue, researchers from the Microbicide Trials Network (MTN) found that the reformulated gel was less harmful to the lining of the rectum than the original vaginal...

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2012-05-11 20:40:28

A panel of health experts have backed a drug to prevent HIV infection in healthy people for the first time. The U.S. panel recommended that regulators approve Truvada for use by people considered at high risk of contracting the AIDS virus. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is not required to follow the panel's advice, but typically is found to do so. Advocates who approve of the panel's advice say that it could be a big milestone in the fight against HIV/AIDS. The FDA...

2012-05-02 21:28:01

African-Americans with HIV are much less likely to adhere to drug therapy than others with the disease, according to a University of Michigan study. Moreover, untreated depression may greatly hinder adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for all low-income, HIV-infected patients, regardless of race. The study is the first known to indicate a true racial disparity in antiretroviral therapy adherence, says Rajesh Balkrishnan, associate professor at the University of Michigan School of...

2012-04-27 22:03:43

UCSF Study Shows Poverty Undercuts Otherwise Major Gains in HIV Treatment In a groundbreaking study published last year, scientists reported that effective treatment with HIV medications not only restores health and prolongs life in many HIV-infected patients, but also curtails transmission to sexual partners up to ninety-seven percent. However, a new study by UCSF scientists shows that lack of basic living needs severely undercuts these advances in impoverished men. The new research...

2012-04-27 12:32:06

UCSF study shows poverty undercuts otherwise major gains in HIV treatment In a groundbreaking study published last year, scientists reported that effective treatment with HIV medications not only restores health and prolongs life in many HIV-infected patients, but also curtails transmission to sexual partners up to ninety-seven percent. However, a new study by UCSF scientists shows that lack of basic living needs severely undercuts these advances in impoverished men. The new research...

2012-04-26 10:55:03

In early results of a large-scale randomized study published in 2010 and led by researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, giving daily antiretroviral drugs (ART) to HIV-infected moms or their breastfeeding babies for 28 weeks proved safe and effective for preventing mother-to-child HIV transmission through breast milk. Now it appears that early weaning — stopping breastfeeding before six months — is of little, if any, protective value against HIV...

2012-04-18 19:59:54

In wealthy countries, antiretroviral therapy (ART) has transformed AIDS into an often-manageable chronic condition, as patients can receive both the therapeutics and the constant monitoring that ensures the therapies remain effective. Developing nations, however, frequently need to balance expansion of treatment access versus the economic resources to sustain the routine blood testing that ART requires. At a time when global funding commitments for AIDS therapy programs are being cut, there...

2012-04-18 13:30:25

New statistical tools can help decide how to allocate resources to the patients who need them the most One of the major problems that has slowed progress toward universal access to life-saving antiretroviral therapy (ART) to treat AIDS in developing nations has been limited availability of laboratories and trained medical staff to conduct blood tests of immune system CD-4 T-cell levels that indicate when to start ART. Now, biostatistician Andrea Foulkes at the University of...

2012-04-18 12:41:24

In this week's PLoS Medicine, Luis Montaner from the Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, USA and colleagues retrospectively apply a potential capacity-saving CD4 count model to a cohort of HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy. The study's findings suggest that the model could be used to optimize laboratory capacity in settings where resources are limited. The authors stress that the method is not intended to replace CD4 count testing or establish a second tier of healthcare, rather the...


Latest Antiretroviral drug Reference Libraries

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2011-01-26 14:08:59

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a lentivirus, causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) which is a condition in humans were the immune system begins to fail, leading to life-threatening opportunistic infections. Infection is transferred through bodily fluids where HIV is present as both free virus particles and within infected immune cells. The four most common routes of infection are unsafe sex, contaminated needles, breast milk, and transmission from an infected mother to her...

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Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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