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Latest Antivenom Stories

2012-03-06 08:00:00

The Life, Earth and Health Sciences Magazine EurekaMag.com publishes insights into specific subjects of all areas of natural science. The latest review cover Carbon Footprint which is the total set of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions caused by an organization, event, product or person, False Widow Spider which are named after the behavior of the female of eating the male after mating, and Silene Stenophylla which is a species of flowering plant in the family Caryophyllaceae and grows in the...

2012-02-17 08:00:00

The Science Magazine EurekaMag.com publishes insights into specific subjects of all areas of natural science. The latest review covers the Aranha Mouse Spider which is a spider whose bite can be serious but can be effectively treated with funnel-web antivenom, Holocene which is a geological epoch which began around 12,000 years ago and continues to the present, and Lantana which is a perennial flowering plant native to tropical regions and growing as herbaceous plants and shrubs up to two...

2011-12-05 11:15:12

Global problem of fatal snakebites and promising solutions such as motorcycle ambulances, rapid diagnostic tests and new antivenoms highlighted at ASTMH meeting Fatal snakebites are a bigger-than-acknowledged global health problem that has been vastly under-reported, according to research presented today at the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene's (ASTMH) annual meeting. A key reason for the low count is that many snakebite victims are treated or die without seeking or...

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2011-08-04 12:40:00

The Food and Drug Administration has approved the first-ever drug as scorpion-sting antivenom. Anascorp, an antivenom produced in Mexico, was tested in U.S. clinical trials. This is the first time a drug that was fully developing in Latin American that has been approved by the FDA. "This is an historic event," Dr. Leslie Boyer, director of the University of Arizona's VIPER Institute (Venom Immunochemistry, Pharmacology and Emergency Response Institute) and lead investigator on the clinical...

2011-06-30 17:47:41

A new low-cost snake antivenom could empower countries such as Papua New Guinea to produce their own antivenoms, putting an end to chronic antivenom shortages and unnecessary deaths. Researchers from the Australian Venom Research Unit (AVRU) at the University of Melbourne have collaborated with scientists from the University of Papua New Guinea and the University of Costa Rica, to develop new antivenom against the lethal Papuan taipan. The preclinical studies of this antivenom have been...

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2011-06-27 05:45:00

Researchers in Australia have found that a chemical compound typically used on heart patients may raise chances of survival for snakebite victims. The study, published in Nature Medicine, claims chemical nitric oxide can slow down, by as much as 50 percent, the time it takes for snake venom to enter the bloodstream allowing time for victims to seek medical help, said lead author Dirk van Helden, professor at the School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Newcastle in Australia. Reuters...

2011-05-11 12:11:49

Giving low-dose adrenaline to patients who have been bitten by a poisonous snake before treatment with the appropriate antivenom is safe and reduces the risk of acute severe reactions to the treatment, but giving promethazine has no such effect and giving hydrocortisone may actually be harmful. These findings from a study led by Asita De Silva from the Clinical Trials Unit, Faculty of Medicine, University of Kelaniya in Ragama, Sri Lanka, are important because in some countries where snake...

2011-03-18 13:40:00

WEST CONSHOHOCKEN, Pa., March 18, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- BTG International Inc., the specialist healthcare company, advises that Poison Prevention Week, which occurs during the third week of March each year, is an ideal time to review proper protocol in the event of actual or suspected poisoning. Knowing what steps to take can reduce potential damage and even prevent death. Accidental ingestion of harmful substances by children is a concern for parents, but many people may not realize that...


Latest Antivenom Reference Libraries

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2009-06-16 22:38:30

The Brown Recluse Spider (Loxosceles reclusa) is a species of arachnid that is native to the USA from the southern Midwest south to the Gulf of Mexico. It can be found in Canada as well around southeast Ontario, and southern Quebec. Its range lies from southeastern Nebraska through southern Iowa, Illinois, and Indiana to southwestern Ohio. In the south, it is native from central Texas to western Georgia. It is not usually found west of the Rocky Mountains. Contrary to popular belief, this...

0_c2be6e5ab79580b9db23d010beec28ce
2007-02-12 21:23:02

The Black Mamba, Dendroaspis polylepis, is a venomous snake from Africa. They can be found in scrub land, bushes and small trees. They tend to live in permanent lairs for long periods if not disturbed. They usually make their homes in vacated insect mounds or hollow trees. The Black Mamba is the largest venomous snake in Africa and the second largest venomous snake in the world. It grows to an average length of 8 feet and may even grow to over 14 feet. It gets its name from the inky...

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2005-06-14 12:40:45

The American copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) is a species of venomous viper native to eastern North America. Mature copperheads have a beautiful coppery colored head and neck. They tend to be smallish snakes, generally about 1.5 ft long (50 cm), but specimens up to 3 ft long (1 m) have been encountered. The body is thin by pit viper standards. There are four clearly defined subspecies. The Northern copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix mokasen) is found throughout the northeastern United...

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Word of the Day
penuche
  • A fudgelike confection of brown sugar, cream or milk, and chopped nuts.
'Penuche' is a variant of 'panocha,' a coarse grade of sugar made in Mexico. 'Panocha' probably comes from the Spanish 'panoja, panocha,' ear of grain.
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