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Latest Aortic valvuloplasty Stories

2011-06-06 15:43:56

Less invasive catheter-based aortic valve replacement and open valve-replacement surgery have a similar one-year survival for patients at high risk for surgery.

2011-04-03 17:24:00

DETROIT, April 3, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- A major new study presented today at the yearly scientific meeting of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) in New Orleans shows conclusively that replacing defective aortic valves in elderly patients through non-invasive "catheterization" - rather than through much more invasive open-heart surgery - leads to significantly better outcomes. The new clinical trial study (PARTNER cohort A: Transcatheter valves noninferior to surgery), documents important...

2011-03-15 15:26:26

Research from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden shows, that a specific inflammatory factor may be important in the development of the heart valve disease aortic stenosis.

2010-12-14 14:30:07

The UK is poorly prepared for the forthcoming epidemic of degenerative valvular heart disease, prompted by a rapidly ageing population, say leading experts in the journal Heart.

2010-09-23 12:36:39

One-year data from the PARTNER clinical trial, published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, demonstrate that transcatheter aortic-valve implantation, compared with standard therapy, resulted in significantly lower rates of death among patients who cannot undergo surgery for aortic stenosis.

2010-09-22 19:56:35

Implantation of a new bioprosthetic-tissue valve into the hearts of patients who have severe aortic stenosis and are too sick or too old for open-heart surgery has been found to both save lives and improve the quality of those lives.

2010-08-27 07:49:00

CHICAGO, Aug. 27 /PRNewswire/ -- When Doris Snyder celebrated her 102nd birthday on August 10, she was that much closer to the expected birth of her first great-granddaughter who's due to arrive early September.


Word of the Day
swell-mobsman
  • A member of the swell-mob; a genteelly clad pickpocket. Sometimes mobsman.
Use of the word 'swell-mobsman' dates at least to the early 1800s.