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Latest Apocrita Stories

Fossil Evidence Indicates Fig Wasps Were Here Long Before Fig Trees
2013-12-06 07:57:54

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers are puzzled by a 115-million-year-old fossilized wasp from northeast Brazil. The puzzle rests in the wasp's ovipositor, the organ through which it lays its eggs. The fossilized wasp's ovipositor looks a lot like those of present-day wasps that lay their eggs in figs. The researchers say that the problem is that figs arose around 65 million years after this wasp was alive. The wasp belongs to the Hymenoptera superfamily...

Rare Sawfly Is Host To Peculiar Parasitoid Wasp
2013-03-25 11:28:01

Pensoft Publishers A mysterious parasitoid wasp was found in the Böhmerwald (Northeast Austria) and reared in the garden of the amateur entomologist Ewald Altenhofer of Gross Gerungs municipality, Austria. The parasitoid was identified by Kees van Achterberg, senior researcher at the Naturalis Biodiversity Center in Leiden, the Netherlands, as the rare Seleucus cuneiformis. It is the first time that a tip of its biology was discovered. The study was published in the open...

2011-08-30 06:27:56

Flight attacks of small parasitoid wasps (no larger than 2.0 mm in size) on ant workers have been filmed by José María Gómez Durán from Madrid. The four species of wasps show amazing adaptations and enormous differences in the tactics they use. Two of the four filmed species are new to science and are described by Dr Kees van Achterberg from NCB Naturalis Leiden. The study was published in the open access journal ZooKeys. Ants are a very...


Latest Apocrita Reference Libraries

0_1b176b063c37655d81f4ab248352d3de
2005-09-12 11:56:41

A wasp is any insect of the order Hymenoptera and suborder Apocrita that is not a bee, sawfly, or an ant. The less familiar suborder Symphyta includes the sawflies and wood wasps, which differ from the Apocrita by having a broad connection between the thorax and abdomen. Also, Symphyta larvae are mostly herbivorous and "caterpillarlike", whereas those of Apocrita are largely predatory or parasitic. Most familiar wasps belong to the Aculeata, a division of the Apocrita whose ovipositors are...

40_d97d298f70e6e3a50cb57d05ec491255
2005-09-07 20:33:37

Apocrita is a suborder of insects in the order Hymenoptera. The Apocrita include wasps, bees and ants, and are comprised of many families. They include the most advanced Hymenoptera and are distinguished from the Symphyta by the narrow waist joining two segments of the abdomen. The ovipositor of the female either extends freely or is retracted, and is converted into a sting for both for defense and for paralyzing prey. Larvae are legless, and may feed either inside a host or in a nest....

40_e84b7351a70d1d2195a6554703b4a633
2005-08-25 08:44:29

A wasp is any insect of the order Hymenoptera and suborder Apocrita that is not a bee, sawfly, or an ant. Less familiar, the suborder Symphyta includes the sawflies and wood wasps, which differ from the Apocrita by having a broad connection between the thorax and abdomen. Also, Symphyta larvae are mostly herbivorous and "caterpillar-like", whereas those of Apocrita are largely predatory or parasitic. Most familiar wasps belong to the Aculeata, a division of the Apocrita whose ovipositors...

37_381f3609ddcdbb9e697e387251e77b95
2005-07-14 11:39:06

Symphyta is a group of insects, a taxonomic suborder of the Hymenoptera. The Symphyta are commonly referred to as sawflies, and include insects belonging to several families. They are considered to be the most primitive Hymenoptera and are closely related to wasps, bees and ants, those being members of the suborder Apocrita. Sawflies are identifiable from most other Hymenoptera by the wide connection between the abdomen and the thorax. The common name comes from the appearance of the...

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