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Latest Apodiformes Stories

New Fossil Helps Explain Evolution Of Hummingbird Flight
2013-05-01 13:38:41

A small bird fossil found in Wyoming could be the link that connects the evolutionary dots between the different flight styles of hummingbirds and swifts.


Latest Apodiformes Reference Libraries

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2008-11-29 21:05:03

The African Palm Swift (Cypsiurus parvus), is a species of swift found in tropical Africa. They spend most of their time in the air, living on insects which it collects in flight. They often feed near the ground, and drink on the wing. This 6.25 inch long species is mainly pale brown in color. It has long swept-back wings that resemble a crescent or a boomerang. The body is slender, and the tail is long and deeply forked, although it is usually held closed. The call is a loud, shrill...

38_678f6874fe61019684e2d93ebc4a6f22
2008-11-29 20:54:52

The White-throated Needle tail (Hirundapus caudacutus), also known as the Needle-tailed Swift or Spine-tailed Swift, is a large bird found in central Asia and southern Siberia. This species is migratory, wintering south to Australia. It is a rare vagrant in western Europe, but has been recorded as far west as Norway, Sweden and Great Britain. This is a bird of rocky hills. This is a large bird, similar in size to the Alpine Swift, but different in build, with a heavier barrel-like body....

45_9250dc26efc59886905b2e0dd88029b8
2008-11-29 19:27:30

The White-rumped Swift (Apus caffer), is a species of swift that is similar to a house martin, but is completely unrelated to that species. They are native to sub-Saharan Africa, and have expanded into Morocco and southern Spain. The wintering grounds of those that migrate is not well known. Only the tropical African populations are year-round residents. The White-rumped Swift is 5.5 to 6 inches long and has a short forked tail and long swept-back wings that resemble a boomerang or...

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Word of the Day
dingle
  • A small wooded valley; a dell.
  • The protecting weather-shed built around the entrance to a house.
  • The roofed-over space between the kitchen and the sleeping-quarters in a logging-camp, commonly used as a storeroom.
The word 'dingle' comes from Middle English dell, hollow.
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