Quantcast

Latest Apoptosis Stories

2014-08-04 12:46:43

Stanford University Medical Center CHARGE, which affects 1 in 10,000 babies, is an acronym whose letters stand for some of the more common symptoms of the condition: coloboma of the eye, heart defects, atresia of the choanae, retardation of growth and/or development, genital and/or urinary abnormalities, and ear abnormalities and deafness. Originally, the researchers were examining the tumor-suppressive properties of the protein, called p53, not investigating developmental disorders....

2014-08-04 09:40:28

University of California - San Diego Biomarker for head and neck cancers identified Although mutations in a gene dubbed "the guardian of the genome" are widely recognized as being associated with more aggressive forms of cancer, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have found evidence suggesting that the deleterious health effects of the mutated gene may in large part be due to other genetic abnormalities, at least in squamous cell head and neck...

2014-07-16 12:42:09

University of North Carolina Health Care UNC researchers lay the groundwork for a new approach to brain cancer treatments and a better understanding of Parkinson's disease Researchers at the UNC School of Medicine have discovered that the protein PARC/CUL9 helps neurons and brain cancer cells override the biochemical mechanisms that lead to cell death in most other cells. In neurons, long-term survival allows for proper brain function as we age. In brain cancer cells, though, long-term...

2014-07-08 14:56:12

Neural Regeneration Research Previous studies have indicated that electrical stimulation of the cerebellar fastigial nucleus in rats may reduce brain infarct size, increase the expression of Ku70 in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion region, and decrease the number of apoptotic neurons. In vitro studies have confirmed that Ku70 can mediate cellular apoptosis by interfering Bax. Dr. Jingli Liu and her team, the First Hospital Affiliated to Guangxi Medical University, China, presumed that the...

2014-06-24 11:18:40

Penn State A virus not known to cause disease kills triple-negative breast cancer cells and killed tumors grown from these cells in mice, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. Understanding how the virus kills cancer may lead to new treatments for breast cancer. Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) infects humans but is not known to cause sickness. In prior studies, the researchers tested the virus on a variety of breast cancers that represent degrees of...

2014-06-20 23:06:04

Italian researchers say a treatment made from a human protein can help improve the effectiveness of chemotherapy for patients fighting malignant pleural mesothelioma. Raleigh, NC (PRWEB) June 20, 2014 A team of cancer doctors says the combination of a lab-created compound based on a human protein and traditional chemotherapy drugs can help shrink mesothelioma tumors better than either treatment alone. Surviving Mesothelioma has just posted an article on the new research. Click here to...

2014-06-09 10:48:48

Brookhaven National Laboratory Structure of membrane protein that plays a role in signaling cell death could be new target for anticancer drugs Sometimes a cell has to die—when it's done with its job or inflicted with injury that could otherwise harm an organism. Conversely, cells that refuse to die when expected can lead to cancer. So scientists interested in fighting cancer have been keenly interested in learning the details of "programmed cell death." They want to understand what...

2014-05-27 23:03:15

Scientists armed with a supercomputer and a vast trove of newly collected data on the body’s most potent “tumor suppressor” gene have created the best map yet of how the gene works, an accomplishment that could lead to new techniques for fighting cancers, which are adept at disabling the gene in order to thrive. Boulder, CO (PRWEB) May 27, 2014 Scientists armed with a supercomputer and a vast trove of newly collected data on the body’s most potent “tumor suppressor” gene have...

2014-05-15 23:02:54

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital analysis reveals how the protein p53, which triggers cancer cells to commit suicide, attaches to its regulatory molecule; findings could lead to drugs to unleash p53 to battle a range of cancers Memphis, Tenn. (PRWEB) May 15, 2014 St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital scientists have mapped the structural details of how p53 attaches to its regulatory protein, called BCL-xL, in the cell. The protein p53 is a key activator of the cell's...

2014-05-13 15:45:49

Walter & Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research A team of Melbourne researchers has shown a recently discovered type of cell death called necroptosis could be the underlying cause of inflammatory disease. The research team discovered that a previously identified molecule involved in necroptosis, called RIPK1, was essential for survival by preventing uncontrolled inflammation. This finding could lead to future treatments for inflammatory diseases including Crohn’s disease,...


Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.