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Last updated on April 21, 2014 at 5:21 EDT

Latest Apoptosis Stories

2011-04-02 01:54:49

When cells find themselves in a tight spot, the cell cycle regulator p21 halts the cell cycle, buying cells time to repair the damage, or if all else fails, to initiate programmed cell death. In contrast to other stress-induced genes, which dispense with the regular transcriptional entourage, p21Cip1 still requires SKIP, a transcription elongation factor that also helps with the editing of transcripts, to be expressed, found researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. In the...

2011-04-02 01:50:49

Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an inflammatory bowel disease thought to be related to aberrant activation of the immune system in the intestine. Recent research has also suggested that regulated cell death (apoptosis) of the intestinal epithelial cells is a contributing factor to the pathogenesis. However, the molecular mechanisms that control the cellular response to inflammation are incompletely understood. In this paper, Lin Zhang, at the University of Pittsburgh, in Pennsylvania, found that...

2011-03-31 07:40:00

BEVERLY, Mass., March 31, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Cellceutix Corporation (OTCQB: CTIX), a biopharmaceutical company focused on discovering and developing small molecule drugs to treat severe medical conditions including drug-resistant cancers, is pleased to announce that additional research has been concluded on Kevetrin(TM), the Company's flagship cancer compound. Kevetrin was shown to increase levels of p21, a key protein responsible for cell cycle arrest, in the lymphocytes of mice....

2011-03-29 13:26:11

Study shows drug effectively shrank tumors, caused few side effects in animals Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have developed a new drug called AT-406 with potential to treat multiple types of cancer. A study, published this week in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, showed that AT-406 effectively targets proteins that block normal cell death from occurring. Blocking these proteins caused tumor cells to die, while not harming normal cells. The...

2011-03-19 16:00:00

JOHNSON CITY, Tenn., March 19, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Recent events in Japan have caused the world to focus on unintended radiation exposure. Exposure to radiation can be a cause for concern - especially if radiation levels reach or exceed 1 Gy. Radiation targets rapidly proliferating cells of the body. Cells of the hematopoietic system (bone marrow) and the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are two such cell types. Damage to these cells initiates programmed cell death (apoptosis). First...

2011-03-11 16:01:54

Cell biologists pondering the death of neurons "” brain cells "” said today that by eliminating one ingredient from the cellular machinery, they prolonged the life of neurons stressed by a pesticide chemical. The finding identifies a potential therapeutic target to slow changes that lead to neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. The researchers, from The University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, found that neurons lacking a substance...

2011-03-10 14:25:36

Neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's are partly attributable to brain inflammation. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet now demonstrate in a paper published in Nature that a well-known family of enzymes can prevent the inflammation and thus constitute a potential target for drugs. Research suggests that microglial cells - the nerve system's primary immune cells - play a critical part in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. The...

2011-03-03 12:29:42

An enzyme viewed as an executioner, because it can push cells to commit suicide, may actually short circuit a second form of cell death, researchers at Emory University School of Medicine have discovered. The finding could shift drug discovery efforts, by leading scientists to rethink how proposed anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory drugs that target the enzyme, called caspase 8, are supposed to work. The results are online this week and will be published in the March 17th edition of Nature....

2011-03-02 20:32:17

Metabolic function for tumor suppressor points to new cancer therapeutics The gene for the protein p53 is the most frequently mutated in human cancer. It encodes a tumor suppressor, and traditionally researchers have assumed that it acts primarily as a regulator of how genes are made into proteins. Now, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine show that the protein has at least one other biochemical activity: controlling the metabolism of the sugar glucose, one of...

2011-03-02 20:27:05

Research 'solves a longstanding mystery regarding the regulation of cell death pathways;' could lead to better cancer and autoimmune disease drugs Reporting in Nature, scientists from Thomas Jefferson University have determined that a single protein called FADD controls multiple cell death pathways, a discovery that could lead to better, more targeted autoimmune disease and cancer drugs. Twelve years ago, internationally-known immunologist Jianke Zhang, Ph.D., an associate professor in the...