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Latest Apoptosis Stories

2013-06-24 11:32:01

A new study by a team of researchers from the University of Notre Dame provides an important new insight into how cancer cells are able to avoid the cell death process. The findings may suggest a chemotherapeutic approach to prevent the spread of cancers. Metastasis, the spread of cancer from one organ to other parts of the body, relies on cancer cells ability to evade a cell death process called anoikis, according to Zachary T. Schafer, Coleman Assistant Professor of Cancer Biology at...

2013-05-19 23:01:26

Australian Researchers Astonished to Learn P53 Not Only Seeks and Destroys, But Prevents DALLAS (PRWEB) May 19, 2013 Scientists are on the verge of unraveling the genesis of cancer. By studying the behavior of distorted genes in the malignant microenvironment (inside the body) studies are attempting to recode damaged gene signals so the body´s immune system can search and destroy cancer. But that´s not all. 1 P53 protein has long been the subject of intense investigation because...

2013-04-26 14:11:20

Proteins, unlike diamonds, aren't forever. And when they wear out, they need to be degraded in the cell back into amino acids, where they will be recycled into new proteins. Researchers at Rockefeller University and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute have identified a new way that the cell's protein recycler, the proteasome, takes care of unwanted and potentially toxic proteins, a finding that has implications for treating muscle wasting, neurodegeneration and cancer. The consensus among...

2013-04-25 20:23:59

New research reveals how the tumor suppressor p53 is shut down in metastatic melanoma -- and how it can be revived Cancer cells are a problem for the body because they multiply recklessly, refuse to die and blithely metastasize to set up shop in places where they don't belong. One protein that keeps healthy cells from behaving this way is a tumor suppressor named p53. This protein stops potentially precancerous cells from dividing and induces suicide in those that are damaged beyond...

2013-04-23 12:06:30

Researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center have found that a deficiency in an important anti-tumor protein, p53, can slow or delay DNA repair after radiation treatment.  They suggest that this is because p53 regulates the expression of two enzymes (JMJD2b and SUV39H1) that control the folding of DNA. According to the researchers, p53 is highly inducible by radiation. Activation of p53 stabilizes chromosomes by promoting the repair of heterochromatin DNA, which controls the expression of...

2013-04-17 17:24:41

A new, pre-clinical study by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center suggests that a novel drug combination could lead to profound leukemia cell death by disrupting the function of two major pro-survival proteins. The effectiveness of the therapy lies in its ability to target a pro-survival cell signaling pathway known as PI3K/AKT/mTOR, upon which the leukemia cells have become dependent. In the study, published in the journal Cancer Research, researchers...

2013-03-18 20:57:34

Results showing the same signaling enzymes can trigger two different processes in the cell sound a warning to biomedical researchers Stroke, heart attacks and numerous other common disorders result in a massive destruction of cells and tissues called necrosis. It´s a violent event: As each cell dies, its membrane ruptures, releasing substances that trigger inflammation, which in turn can cause more cellular necrosis. A new Weizmann Institute study may help develop targeted therapies...


Word of the Day
callithump
  • A somewhat riotous parade, accompanied with the blowing of tin horns, and other discordant noises; also, a burlesque serenade; a charivari.
'Callithump' is a back-formation of 'callithumpian,' a 'fanciful formation' according to the Oxford English Dictionary. However, the English Dialect Dictionary, says 'Gallithumpians' is a Dorset and Devon word from the 1790s that refers to 'a society of radical social reformers' or 'noisy disturbers of elections and meetings.'
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