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Latest Appalachian Mountains Stories

Better Understanding Of Marcellus Shale Could Inform Decisions On Hydrofracking
2014-07-22 03:54:03

University of Rochester The 1500 mile Appalachian mountain chain runs along a nearly straight line from Alabama to Newfoundland—except for a curious bend in Pennsylvania and New York State. Researchers from the College of New Jersey and the University of Rochester now know what caused that bend—a dense, underground block of rigid, volcanic rock forced the chain to shift eastward as it was forming millions of years ago. According to Cindy Ebinger, a professor of earth and...

New Species Of Moth Named To Honor The Cherokee Nation
2014-06-30 03:36:44

Pensoft Publishers A small, drab and highly inconspicuous moth has been flitting nameless about its special niche among the middle elevations of one of the world's oldest mountain ranges, the southern Appalachian Mountains in North America. A team of American scientists has now identified this new to science species as Cherokeea attakullakulla and described it in a special issue of the open access journal ZooKeys. In all probability, it has been frequenting these haunts for tens of...

2013-12-20 23:27:03

The Pine Mountain Range in west-central Georgia is rooted in unique and diverse plant and animal species, and has great historical value. An article in the journal Castanea discusses the significance of the ecosystems found coexisting on this range, as well as the importance of and ways to conserve the species that live there before they disappear forever. Jacksonville, AL (PRWEB) December 20, 2013 Castanea – In an age focused on hybrid cars, solar-paneled houses, and reusable water...

Why Have Some Mountain Ranges Exceeded Their Expected Lifespan?
2013-06-27 19:07:30

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New details published in the journal Nature reveals reasons behind why some mountain ranges exceed their expected lifespan. Interactions between landslides and erosion has helped scientists understand the reasons behind the lifespan of some of the world's iconic mountains. Researchers say this study answers questions as to why there was fast erosion in active mountain ranges in the Himalayas and slow erosion in others like the Great...

Rock Art Provides Insight Into Prehistoric Native American Societies
2013-06-20 05:46:54

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Perhaps the most widespread and oldest art in the US, prehistoric rock art can be found throughout the Appalachian Mountains. A new study led by University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) anthropology professor Jan Simek reveals that each engraving or drawing is strategically placed to reveal a cosmological puzzle. As the discoveries of prehistoric rock art have become more commonplace, the evidence is building that all of the drawings...

Death Of Hemlock Trees Creates New Life For Hardwood Trees
2012-12-20 16:47:46

University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences Due to the introduction of exotic pests and pathogens, tree species are being eliminated one by one from forest ecosystems. In some cases, scientists can observe immediately how their loss affects the environment, whereas in other cases, creative puzzle solving and analysis reveal unexpected repercussions. In the case of the loss of the hemlock tree, University of Illinois landscape and ecosystem ecologist...

2012-05-18 11:16:44

Shortleaf pine-hardwood ecosystem restoration following insect outbreak Research by USDA Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) scientists shows that the impacts of recent outbreaks of southern pine beetle further degraded shortleaf pine-hardwood forest ecosystems in the southern Appalachian region. The authors suggest that cutting and burning these sites reduces heavy fuel loads, improves soil nutrient status, and opens the canopy for restoration of these shortleaf pine...

2011-09-27 14:22:13

An analysis of two decades of data collected by the U.S. Forest Service´s Forest and Inventory Analysis (FIA) program shows that the live volume of hemlocks in the eastern United States is increasing despite infestations of hemlock woolly adelgidthat have decimated local populations. The information comes from an e-Science Update co-authored by scientists from two U.S. Forest Service research stations, the Northern Research Station (NRS) and the Southern Research Station (SRS), and...

2011-09-27 11:33:25

A recent analysis of two decades of USDA Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) data shows the live volume of hemlocks in the eastern United States still increasing despite spreading infestations of hemlock woolly adelgid. FIA scientists from the Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) and Northern Research Station (NRS) published the information as an SRS e-Science Update in early August. The FIA researchers conducted the analysis for this update on 20 years of data...


Word of the Day
out-herod
  • In the phrase to out-herod Herod, to be more violent than Herod (as represented in the old mystery plays); hence, to exceed in any excess of evil.
Herod refers to 'Herod the Great,' a Roman client king and 'a madman who murdered his own family and a great many rabbis.' According to the OED, the term is 'chiefly with allusion to Shakespeare's use' in Hamlet.
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