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Latest Appalachian Mountains Stories

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2010-04-06 13:25:19

A new study reconstructing thousands of years of fire history in the southern Appalachians supports the use of prescribed fire, or controlled burns, as a tool to reduce the risk of wildfires, restore and maintain forest health and protect rare ecological communities in the region's forests. Duke University researchers used radiocarbon analysis of 82 soil charcoal samples dating from 1977 to more than 4,000 years ago to reconstruct the fire history of a 25-acre site in the Nantahala National...

2009-09-03 12:50:41

The U.S. Forest Service says it's determined an expansion of rhododendron plants along Southern Appalachian slopes might increase the risk of landslides. Scientists at the Forest Service's Southern Research Station in Atlanta said their findings suggest the expansion of rosebay rhododendron (Rhododendron maximum) in Southern Appalachian mountain hollows may increase the likelihood of landslides during and after intense rain events. In an article recently published online in the journal Earth...

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2009-08-31 13:00:00

Research by U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) scientists and partners suggests that the expansion of rosebay rhododendron (Rhododendron maximum) in Southern Appalachian mountain hollows may increase the likelihood of landslides during and after intense rain events.In an article recently published online in JGR-Earth Surface, SRS researchers Chelcy Ford and Jim Vose, along with T.C. Hales and Larry Band (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), examine how the...

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2009-03-27 14:49:08

Volunteers in Kentucky are gathering to plant millions of trees in a massive reforestation project to undo the damages caused to Appalachian mining sites. Last week, about 70 volunteers came into Blackey, Kentucky as a part of the Appalachian Regional Reforestation Initiative, a movement led by the U.S. Office of Surface Mining to plant thousands of trees on lands that were left barren by coal mining projects. "We've got an estimated 741,000 acres in Appalachia that are barren," Sam Adams,...

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2009-02-27 08:22:23

New research by U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) scientists and partners suggests the hemlock woolly adelgid is killing hemlock trees faster than expected in the southern Appalachians and rapidly altering the carbon cycle of these forests. SRS researchers and cooperators from the University of Georgia published the findings in the most recent issue of the journal Ecosystems. "The study marks the first time that scientists have tracked the short-term effects hemlock woolly...

2008-09-06 03:00:11

By Laurie Edwards After a lengthy discussion, the Tri-County Lake Administrative Commission on Tuesday voted by a slim margin to postpone responding to the U.S. Coast Guard regarding the conversion of the lake's navigation system. On July 9, TLAC, which maintains the lake's navigational markers, received a letter from the Coast Guard requesting TLAC submit an application by Nov. 9 detailing how the board would undergo the conversion to Coast Guard-approved markers. The current...

2008-08-19 12:00:49

Zone Oil & Gas, LLC (ZONE) announced today that it has signed an Exploration and Geophysical Joint Venture Agreement with Penn Virginia Corporation (NYSE:PVA). The Joint Venture covers approximately 40,000 acres under lease in Tioga, Potter, Somerset, Westmoreland and Fayette Counties, Pennsylvania, and centers on exploring the Marcellus Shale, and the Oriskany and Tuscarora formations. Under the terms of the agreement, the joint venture will conduct at least one 3-D seismic survey...

2008-07-26 03:00:23

By Cathy Benson cathy.benson@botetourtview.com Ben Shrader, of Bedford, is a volunteer doing a motion camera project, particularly along the Blue Ridge Parkway and the Appalachian Trail, called the Appalachian Trail project. It could put the issue to rest that there are no mountain lions in Virginia. These pictures came from the Cove Mountain area of Botetourt before the fire. Shrader once saw what he believes to be a mountain lion in the Blue Ridge Parkway area but he has his doubts as...

2008-07-26 03:00:23

By Laurie Edwards The Department of Environmental Quality currently is reviewing Appalachian Power's permit application to continue operating the Smith Mountain Project, a hydroelectric powerhouse consisting of Smith Mountain and Leesville dams. The application is part of Appalachian's relicensing process through Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The current license expires in 2010. Joe Hassel of DEQ will lead a public hearing on Aug. 7 from 7 to 9:30 p.m. at Gretna High School...

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2008-04-06 00:00:00

In a double-barreled approach to environmental restoration, Appalachian mountains scarred by strip-mining are being planted with American chestnut trees, a species that has been all but wiped out in the United States by a fungus. For 30 years or so, federal regulations essentially said that once a forested mountainside was scraped open and the coal extracted, mine companies had to smooth the soil over and seed it with grass. But recently, federal regulators have begun promoting the planting...