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Latest Aquatic insects Stories

2010-06-04 13:32:57

The number of native fish and aquatic insects, especially those that are pollution sensitive, declines in urban and suburban streams at low levels of development "” levels often considered protective for stream communities, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey. "When the area of driveways, parking lots, streets and other impervious cover reaches 10 percent of a watershed area, many types of pollution sensitive aquatic insects decline by as much as one third, compared...

2009-01-08 12:59:46

Insects mistake buildings, cars and even roads for water, laying eggs that will never hatch and jeopardizing ecosystems, a U.S. university researcher said. These ecological traps are caused by polarized light reflecting from windows, asphalt roads -- even plastic sheets and oil spills, Michigan State University research associate Bruce Robertson said. To some species, the light creates an appearance that mimics the surface of the water, which the insects use to breed and feed, he and...

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2009-01-07 09:56:47

'Ecological traps' cause animal behaviors that can lead to death Human-made light sources can alter natural light cycles, causing animals that rely on light cues to make mistakes when moving through their environment. In the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, a collaboration of ecologists, biologists and biophysicists has now shown that in addition to direct light, cues from polarized light can trigger animal behaviors leading to injury and often death. Artificial light that...

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2008-08-02 12:30:00

Research shows how insects use trapped oxygen to breathe underwater Hundreds of insect species spend much of their time underwater, where food may be more plentiful. MIT mathematicians have now figured out exactly how those insects breathe underwater. By virtue of their rough, water-repellent coat, when submerged these insects trap a thin layer of air on their bodies. These bubbles not only serve as a finite oxygen store, but also allow the insects to absorb oxygen from the surrounding...


Latest Aquatic insects Reference Libraries

Gray Sanddragon, Progomphus borealis
2013-07-11 13:32:30

The gray sanddragon (Progomphus borealis) is a species of dragonfly that can be found in many areas including Arizona, California, Idaho, Texas, New Mexico, Washington, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. This species prefers a habitat near streams and rivers in desert climates. It is typically seen between the months of June and September, but it can also be seen between April and October. Adult gray sanddragons reach an average body length between 2.2 and 2.4 inches, while its nymphs or larvae...

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