Quantcast
Last updated on April 16, 2014 at 10:52 EDT

Latest Aquatic plants Stories

2014-03-26 11:34:19

One of the most serious threats to global biodiversity and the leisure and tourism industries is set to increase with climate change according to new research by Queen's University Belfast. Researchers at Queen's have found that certain invasive weeds, which have previously been killed off by low winter temperatures, are set to thrive as global temperatures increase. The team based at Quercus, Northern Ireland's centre for biodiversity and conservation science research, predicts that...

Duckweed Has Potential As Biofuel Source
2014-02-19 15:07:45

DOE/Joint Genome Institute Duckweed is a tiny floating plant that's been known to drive people daffy. It's one of the smallest and fastest-growing flowering plants that often becomes a hard-to-control weed in ponds and small lakes. But it's also been exploited to clean contaminated water and as a source to produce pharmaceuticals. Now, the genome of Greater Duckweed (Spirodela polyrhiza) has given this miniscule plant's potential as a biofuel source a big boost. In a paper published...

New System For Early Detection Of Plant Spread In Bodies Of Water
2013-08-01 10:23:09

Technical University Munich As a result of climate change, certain undesirable aquatic plants are starting to invade German water bodies. Even popular recreation areas like Lake Starnberg have been affected, leading to a growing need to monitor the spread of these plants. Up to now, regular monitoring has proven to be a costly process. But in a new approach, researchers at Technische Universitat Munchen (TUM) have developed a quicker and less expensive method. Taking a dip in a...

2012-03-19 23:00:38

Discovery of hydrilla in New York's Finger Lakes region represents a potential environmental disaster. The Weed Science Society of America is calling attention to efforts underway to eradicate the damaging aquatic weed and protect some of our most valuable natural resources. Lawrence, KS (PRWEB) March 19, 2012 Six months ago, one of the world´s most aggressive aquatic weeds was spotted in an inlet adjoining Cayuga Lake, part of New York´s famed Finger Lakes. The culprit was...

2011-04-05 00:00:27

Weed scientists representing scientific societies from across the nation are protesting a decision to "Ëœzero out' funding for an Army Corps of Engineers research program that helps to protect our nation's waterways and water supply from invasive weeds. Lawrence, KS (PRWEB) April 4, 2011 Today the Weed Science Society of America(WSSA) announced it has joined nearly a dozen national and regional weed management associations in expressing strong support for continued funding of an...

2010-09-08 00:41:06

The report, "Long-term reductions in anthropogenic nutrients link to improvements in Chesapeake Bay habitat is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. http://www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1003590107.  Images are available on the project website. The Potomac River in Washington, D.C. is showing multiple benefits from restoration efforts, newly published research suggests. Reduced nutrients and improved water clarity have increased the abundance and diversity...

2009-05-13 14:01:32

Biologists in northeastern Illinois are concerned about an invasive water plant from Brazil, one they found growing under a layer of ice. Brazilian elodea, often used as a decorative plant in aquariums, has become a major pest in the southern United States. The plant creates thick mats that hamper boats and can keep fish from migrating. In the north, cold winter weather usually keeps the plant at bay. But Mike Adam, a senior biologist with the Lake County Health Department, told The...

2009-04-07 10:39:38

Researchers at North Carolina State University have found that a tiny aquatic plant can be used to clean up animal waste at industrial hog farms and potentially be part of the answer for the global energy crisis. Their research shows that growing duckweed on hog wastewater can produce five to six times more starch per acre than corn, according to researcher Dr. Jay Cheng. This means that ethanol production using duckweed could be "faster and cheaper than from corn," says fellow researcher Dr....

2008-10-10 15:00:15

By SHARPE, Marty FOUR hundred grass carp introduced to a Hawke's Bay lake have chewed their way through an aquatic weed called an "aggressive environmental cancer". The eradication of hydrilla from Lake Eland, 45 kilometres west of Napier, bodes well for Biosecurity New Zealand's plans to release hundreds more fish into nearby lakes that are also infested with the weed. The carp were put into the four hectare man-made Lake Eland in 1986 in the hope they would control hydrilla -- one...

2008-09-19 15:00:42

By Clinton Thomas Summer is approaching and the desire to be outside and enjoy the farm ponds comes right along with it. Excessive surface plant growth takes away the beauty of the ponds and can also destroy the natural balance of the pond. Managing the plant growth effectively will sustain ponds for longer periods of time. Aquatic plant growth is a necessity in any pond. Without plants, many other aquatic organisms would die. The additional oxygen and food that plants provide ensure...


Latest Aquatic plants Reference Libraries

Mexican water Lily, Nymphaea mexicana
2014-01-17 13:39:59

The Nymphaea mexicana is a flowering plant species. The aquatic species may also be referred to as the Yellow water lily, the Mexican water lily or the Banana water lily. N. mexicana is a member of the Nymphaeaceae family. The plant can be found in the southern US and Mexico. In some cases Nymphaea mexicana has been introduced to non-native, wetland areas out of its normal range and it has been known to invade that ecosystem. The plant may be cultivated for its attractive qualities and...

Santa Cruz Water Lily, Victoria cruziana
2014-01-14 17:40:04

Victoria cruziana is a tropical water lily species. The species may also be referred to as the Santa Cruz water lily, the Water platter or the Yrupe. V. cruziana is a member of the Nymphaeaceae family. The plant is found in South America, specifically Argentina and Paraguay. The very first known V. cruziana species was discovered in Bolivia. Specimens were collected and sent to France where they were named. Victoria cruziana roots itself at the water garden’s bottom and grows upwards....

Victoria amazonica
2014-01-14 17:25:27

Victoria amazonica is large species of water lily plant. In fact, the species is the largest known plant in its family, the Nymphaeaceae family. V. amazonica is native to the Amazon River basin. The plant flourishes in shallow waters, specifically oxbow lakes and bayous. The very first publication of the plant’s classification was in 1837. John Lindley named the species from specimens brought to him from the British Guiana. Victoria amazonica grows up to 9.8 feet in diameter. Its flowers...

Pygmy Rwandan Water Lily, Nymphaea thermarum
2014-01-14 16:38:56

Nymphaea thermarum is a small species of water lily plant. The species is actually the smallest known species in its genus. N. thermarum belongs to the Nymphaeaceae family. The plant is native to the muddy waters of an overflowing freshwater hot spring in Mashyuza, Rwanda. Up until recently the plant was considered extinct in its native habitat; however, it has been cultivated from seed at The Royal Botanic Gardens. Nymphaea thermarum will typically grow only .4 inches in diameter. The...

Hairy Water Lily, Nymphaea pubescens
2014-01-14 16:22:59

Nymphaea pubescens is an aquatic water lily species. The plant may also be referred to as the Hairy water lily of the Pink water lily. N. pubescens can be found throughout Asia and in northeastern Australia. N. pubescens plants are bottom rooted and grow to the water’s surface. Its leaves float on the water and typically grow between 5.9 to 10.2 inches. The undersides of the plant’s leaves and its stems have a fuzzy texture. Its flowers rest on the center of the leaves pad and will...

More Articles (17 articles) »