Quantcast

Latest Arachnids Stories

a3740b386c84e8a9c5341c31f615bdb6
2011-06-09 12:32:44

It has 8 hairy legs, spins webs, hunts prey and lives its entire life under the surface of the water. No, it is not the something from a bad horror film, the Argyroneta aquatica, or Diving Bell Spider is the subject of a fascinating study published in the Journal of Experimental Biology. "It is an iconic animal; I had read about the spider as a small boy in popular literature about ponds," says Roger Seymour from the University of Adelaide. Each spider constructs a net of silk in vegetation...

2011-06-05 00:02:41

A spectacular golden textile, conceived and created by Simon Peers and Nicholas Godley in Madagascar from silk thread collected from over one million Golden Orb spiders (Nephila madagascariensis), will go on exhibit at the Art Institute of Chicago, the country's second largest art museum. On special loan to the museum from Mssrs. Peers and Godley as part of the inaugural celebration of the museum's new galleries devoted to African art and Indian art of the Americas, the Spider Silk textile...

d9ed1c77b9191180a7663c8d8a4632ff
2011-05-31 09:01:09

Decorative white silk crosses are an ingenious tactic used by orb-weaving spiders to protect their webs from damage, a new study from the University of Melbourne has revealed. The team, led by Dr Andre Walter and Professor Mark Elgar from the University of Melbourne's Department of Zoology, found that orb-weaving spiders respond to severe damage to their webs by building bigger silk crosses, but if the damage is mild they don't bother adding extra decoration. Professor Mark Elgar said web...

789507d44fbb5b5244c575c7d7797211
2011-05-23 07:43:56

Researchers from the King Juan Carlos University (URJC) have carried out a research study published in Biological Conservation, which looked at whether spiders were more tolerant of human impact than other animals. The answer was no: arachnids suffer the consequences of changes to their landscape just like any other animal. "The abundance and number of spider species is negatively affected by the impact of many human land uses, such as habitat fragmentation, fire and pesticides", Samuel...

6a338fdefc62e43f6fbcb664b8ad3ef6
2011-05-16 08:15:00

Climbing is possibly one of the riskiest things an adult tarantula can do. Weighing in at anything up to 50gm, the dry attachment systems that keep daintier spiders firmly anchored are on the verge of failure in these colossal arachnids. 'The animals are very delicate. They wouldn't survive a fall from any height,' explains Claire Rind from the University of Newcastle, UK. In 2006, Stanislav Gorb and his colleagues published a paper in Nature suggesting that tarantulas may save themselves...

3d274883ace806413a73a6260034790d1
2011-04-20 11:53:41

A fossilized spider, uncovered in inner Mongolia, is thought to be the largest ever spider fossil discovered. It has been so perfectly preserved from 165 million years ago that scientists have identified it down to the exact species and that is was an adult female, BBC News reports. This specimen was uncovered from at a site called Daohugou in Inner Mongolia, also home to areas filled with fossilized salamanders, small primitive mammals, insects and water crustaceans. This fossilized Golden...

2011-03-02 13:27:25

Animals' capacity to adapt is a factor in how they are likely to respond to changing climate conditions. This conclusion of a new study published March 2 in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B is not especially surprising, says author Brandon Barton, but confirms the importance of accounting for local adaptation when determining the likely ecological effects of climate change. The work shows that the ability of the top predator in a well-studied food web to adapt to local temperatures can...

01d830626e2eaf4964384d433ebad77e1
2011-01-24 10:25:00

New research from the University of Cincinnati shows that when male wolf spiders are courting, they can modify their mating signals depending on the environmental surface in order to ensure that their message gets through. The researchers said that the wolf spiders are leaving little to chance when it comes to increasing their opportunities to successfully mate. Male wolf spiders adjust the modes of their signaling depending on the habitat on which they find themselves in order to improve...

d66fae5e6f4425bf0a36a96bda1b7af7
2010-12-06 06:35:00

Studying spider silk, NSF-supported researchers learn about the properties of this sticky material, and their findings could lead to new bio-adhesives and glues that work under water Ali Dhinojwala and Vasav Sahni consider themselves materials scientists, not biologists. They study surfaces, friction and adhesion. Nevertheless, they have discovered that understanding how nature makes things stick sometimes means getting up close and personal with the creatures responsible. When they...

115b687d28d657bf1cbcae5af796230a1
2010-04-07 13:17:03

Study shows how birds, bats and lizards play their roles in preserving plant species in face of global climate change Add insect-feeding birds, bats and lizards to the front lines of the battle against global climate change. Summarizing the results of more than 100 experiments conducted on four continents, UC Irvine ecologist Kailen A. Mooney and colleagues found that these insect-gobbling animals increase plant growth by reducing the abundance of plant-feeding insects and the damage they do...


Latest Arachnids Reference Libraries

Funnel Weavers, Agelenidae
2014-06-19 13:16:37

Agelenidae is a family that holds about 1,200 recognized species of funnel weaver spiders that occur throughout the world. These spiders build funnel shaped webs that trap prey in their complicated patterns, but they should not be confused with other families of spiders that build funnel webs like funnel-web spiders or funnel-web tarantulas. Funnel weavers can reach an average body length between .1 inches in the smallest species and .7 inches, although the largest species can reach total...

Cellar Spider, Pholcus phalangioides
2014-04-07 13:05:31

The Cellar Spider (Pholcus phalangioides), known also as the Skull Spider because of its cephalothorax resembling a human skull, is a spider belonging to the family Pholcidae. The females have a body length of about 9 millimeters; the males are slightly smaller. The legs are about 5 to 6 times the length of the body. Its habit of living on the ceilings of room, garages, caves, or cellars gives rise to one of its common names. They are thought to be beneficial in some parts of the world...

Tailed Daddy Longlegs Spider, Crossopriza lyoni
2014-04-07 12:30:20

Crossopriza lyoni is a widespread species of cellar spiders that prefer to live in or around human structures. They are commonly known as Tailed Cellar Spiders, Tailed Daddy Longlegs Spiders, and occasionally Box Spiders. They all possess exceptionally long and fragile legs that can reach up to 2.4 inches long and a body length of that ranges from .098 to .28 inches. Their abdomens are distinctly square shaped when they are viewed from the side and their carapace is more or less circular...

Kauai Cave Wolf Spider
2014-04-01 13:14:31

Scientific name: Adelocosa anops Common Names: Kauai Cave Wolf Spider, Big-Eyed Wolf Spider Status: Listed as endangered on the IUCN Red List in 1996 Geography: United States, Hawaii Conservation Information: This particular species is only known to occur in a few caves in a lava flow within an area consisting of 4.1 square miles in the Koloa-Poipu region of Kauai, Hawaii. Only six populations are known to exist as of April 1, 2014. Phylum: Arthropoda Class: Arachnida...

Spruce Fir Moss Spider, Microhexura montivaga
2013-08-26 12:08:18

The Spruce Fir Moss Spider (Microhexura montivaga) is an endangered species of spider that can be found at high elevations in the southern Appalachian Mountains. Initially identified in 1923, they inhabit moss that grows on rocks under the forest canopy. It is one of the smallest mygalomorph spiders, with the adults only measuring 3 to 4 millimeters. The coloration varies from light brown to yellow-brown to a darker reddish brown color, with no markings on its abdomen. Their chelicerae...

More Articles (11 articles) »
Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
Related