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Latest ARC Centre of Excellence Stories

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2012-03-13 06:53:05

Australian scientists have bred a variety of durum wheat that can grow up to 25% better in salty soils. Scientists from the CSIRO Plant Industry discovered a salt tolerant gene and, using non-GM breeding techniques, implemented this gene into a commercial durum wheat. The field tests of this crop show remarkable results. Researchers from the University of Adelaide´s Waite Research Institute are leading the effort to understand how this specific gene lends the wheat the ability to...

2012-03-12 09:55:40

A team of Australian scientists has bred salt tolerance into a variety of durum wheat that shows improved grain yield by 25% on salty soils. Using 'non-GM' crop breeding techniques, scientists from CSIRO Plant Industry have introduced a salt-tolerant gene into a commercial durum wheat, with spectacular results shown in field tests. Researchers at the University of Adelaide's Waite Research Institute have led the effort to understand how the gene delivers salinity tolerance to the plants....

Image 1 - Discovery Gives Hope For Saving Coral Reefs
2011-09-27 07:31:49

An international team of scientists has achieved a major breakthrough in fishing sustainability on coral reefs which could play a vital role in preventing their collapse. “Fishermen and scientists have long wondered how many fish can be taken off a reef before it collapses, says Dr Nick Graham of the ARC Centre of Excellence (ARC CoE) for Coral Reef Studies and James Cook University. “The consequences of overfishing can be severe to the ecosystem and may take decades to...

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2011-07-05 10:53:13

Australian scientists today announced they have sequenced the genome of the staghorn coral Acropora millepora, a major component of the Great Barrier Reef and coral reefs worldwide. This is the first animal genome project to be carried out entirely in Australia, and is an important milestone in Australian biotechnology and in the study of coral reefs, said the researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and the Australian Genome Research Facility (AGRF). "This is a...

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2011-05-19 08:04:49

Bees can find their way home from an amazing 11 kilometers away over several days' travel, thanks to their ability to remember landmarks and read information from the sky, a new study shows. Vision scientists have found more reasons for the honeybee's incredible knack of navigating cross-country"“ these creatures often rely on the position of the sun, the polarization of light in the sky, the panorama view of the horizon and landmarks including towers, mountains or lakes. Led by...

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2011-02-15 09:25:47

More than a third of coral reef fish species are in jeopardy of local extinction from the impacts of climate change on coral reefs, a new scientific study has found. (Local extinction refers to the loss of species from individual locations, while they continue to persist elsewhere across their range.) A new predictive method developed by an international team of marine scientists has found that a third of reef fishes studied across the Indian Ocean are potentially vulnerable to increasing...

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2010-12-10 10:25:48

Contrary to the recently established theory that marsupials have excellent color vision, research has shown that the wallaby is a rare exception. The research team, led by Dr Jan Hemmi from the ARC Centre of Excellence in Vision Science and The Australian National University, has shown that Tammar wallabies are much weaker in discriminating different colors because they are missing one type of visual pigment cell. "Dr Ebeling has demonstrated that wallabies do not have the complete set of...

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2008-10-01 10:48:29

The roadmap to the future of the gorgeously-decorated fish which throng Australia's coral reefs and help earn the nation $5 billion a year from tourism may well be written in their genes. Of particular importance may be to protect "Ëœpioneer' fish populations which are able to re-colonize regions of reef devastated by global warming and other impacts or settle new areas as the corals move south, says Dr Line Bay of the ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies, James Cook...


Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.