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Latest Archaea Stories

2014-07-07 10:23:08

BGI Shenzhen Researchers from BGI, working within the Metagenomics of the Human Intestinal Tract (MetaHIT) project, and in collaboration with other institutions around the world , have established the highest quality integrated gene set for the human gut microbiome to date- a close-to-complete catalogue of the microbes that reside inside us and massively outnumber our own cells. While the roughly 20,000 genes in the human genome have been available for over a decade, the gene catalog of...

Key To Adaptation Limits Of Ocean Dwellers Uncovered By Scientists
2014-07-02 03:35:33

Alfred Wegener Institute The simpler a marine organism is structured, the better it is suited for survival during climate change. Scientists of the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, discovered this in a new meta-study, which appears today in the research journal Global Change Biology. For the first time biologists studied the relationship between the complexity of life forms and the ultimate limits of their adaptation to a warmer climate. While...

2014-04-08 10:58:47

New insights into a surprisingly flexible immune system present in bacteria for combating viruses and other foreign DNA invaders have been revealed by researchers from New Zealand's University of Otago and the Netherlands. A team led by Dr Peter Fineran of the Department of Microbiology and Immunology are studying the genetic basis of adaptive immunity in bacteria that cause potato 'soft rot' and in E. coli bacteria. Through their recent collaboration they have found that these bacterial...

Global Warming Could Increase Methane Emissions From Freshwater Ecosystems
2014-03-19 17:22:42

University of Exeter New research led by the University of Exeter suggests that rising global temperatures will increase the quantity of the key greenhouse gas methane emitted from freshwater ecosystems to the Earth's atmosphere – which could in turn lead to further warming. The collaborative study, led by Dr Gabriel Yvon-Durocher from the University of Exeter, collated data from hundreds of laboratory experiments and field surveys to demonstrate that the speed at which methane fluxes...

UW graduate student Katherine Heal
2014-02-25 06:38:00

Hannah Hickey, University of Washington The phrase, 'Eat your vitamins,' applies to marine animals just like humans. Many vitamins, including B-12, are elusive in the ocean environment. University of Washington researchers used new tools to measure and track B-12 vitamins in the ocean. Once believed to be manufactured only by marine bacteria, the new results show that a whole different class of organism, archaea, can supply this essential vitamin. The results were presented Feb. 24 at...

Photosynthesis-Activating Protein Likely Predates Oxygen On Earth
2014-02-09 08:21:12

[ Watch the Video: Photosynthesis Older Than Oxygen ] redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports – Your Universe Online Thioredoxin, a protein essential to the process of photosynthesis in plants, likely developed on Earth long before oxygen ever became available, according to a study published in last week’s early online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. In the study, an international team of researchers analyzing methane-producing microbes found that...

2014-02-07 13:15:15

A team of researchers led by Virginia Tech and University of California, Berkeley, scientists has discovered that a regulatory process that turns on photosynthesis in plants at daybreak likely developed on Earth in ancient microbes 2.5 billion years ago, long before oxygen became available. The research opens new scientific areas in the fields of evolutionary biology and microbiology. The work also has broad societal implications as it allows scientists to better understand the production...

2013-11-04 15:24:01

A rudimentary form of life that is found in some of the harshest environments on earth is able to sidestep normal replication processes and reproduce by the back door, researchers at The University of Nottingham have found. The study, published in the journal Nature, centers on Haloferax volcanii — part of a family of single-celled organisms called archaea that until recently were thought to be a type of bacteria. The findings, led by scientists from the University's School of Life...

Sediments From The Deep Sea Give Insight Into Dynamics Of The Deep Biosphere
2013-10-22 14:53:38

Max Planck Institute Traces of past microbial life in sediments off the coast of Peru document how the microbial ecosystem under the seafloor has responded to climate change over hundreds of thousands of years. For more a decade scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology and their colleagues at MARUM and the University of Aarhus have investigated microbial life from this habitat. This "Deep Biosphere", reaching several hundred meters below the seafloor, is exclusively...

Promiscuous Extremophiles Better Oil Spill Cleanup
2013-10-01 09:51:10

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers working in Antarctica have created a detailed ecological picture of so-called extremophile bacteria living in extremely salty water that can hit temperatures of -4 degrees Fahrenheit. The bacteria found in Vestfold Hills, Deep Lake – known as haloarchaea – are giving scientists new information on how life can survive in such dire conditions. They could also potentially provide new tools for bioengineering techniques,...


Word of the Day
negawatt
  • A unit of saved energy.
Coined by Amory Lovins, chairman of the Rocky Mountain Institute as a contraction of negative watt on the model of similar compounds like megawatt.