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Latest Archaea Stories

Dark Ocean Carbon Absorption Not Enough To Restrict Global Warming
2013-09-06 07:46:40

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study led by the University of Iowa shows that although microbes that live below 600 feet where light doesn’t penetrate – the so called “dark ocean”-- might not absorb enough carbon to curtail global warming, they do absorb considerable amounts of carbon, meriting further study. The findings of this study were published in the International Society of Microbial Ecology Journal. While many people are familiar with the...

Dark Matter In The Biological Realm
2013-07-17 04:31:08

John P. Millis, Ph.D. for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A hot topic in astronomy is the search for dark matter - mass that seems to dominate the Universe, yet eludes our detection. Similarly, the field of biology encounters its own "dark matter" problem. Microbial dark matter, as it's called, draws its parallels from its cosmological cousin in that it is all around us, dominating this Earthly domain. Yet, it is incredibly difficult to characterize. "Microbes are the most abundant...

Light Shed On British Columbia's Unseen Biodiversity With Global Survey Of Microbial 'Dark Matter'
2013-07-16 09:12:00

University of British Columbia A landmark single-cell genomic study of microorgansims from sites across the globe is highlighting British Columbia's role as an 'oasis' of biodiversity. The findings, to be published Sunday in Nature, could also prompt scientists to redefine how the tree of life represents relationships among and between life's three domains. "British Columbia has long been recognized for its biological diversity in flora and fauna," says University of British Columbia...

2013-06-13 10:00:50

Microbes are living more than 500 feet beneath the seafloor in 5 million-year-old sediment, according to new findings by researchers at the University of Delaware and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). Genetic material in mud from the bottom of the ocean – called the deep biosphere –revealed an ecosystem of active bacteria, fungi and other microscopic organisms at depths deeper than a skyscraper is high. The findings were published in Nature on June 12. “This...

2013-06-11 13:29:45

Thermophiles, humans share ancient machinery used in cell division Biologists from Indiana University and Montana State University have discovered a striking connection between viruses such as HIV and Ebola and viruses that infect organisms called archaea that grow in volcanic hot springs. Despite the huge difference in environments and a 2 billion year evolutionary time span between archaea and humans, the viruses hijack the same set of proteins to break out of infected cells. In...

Seabed Microbiology Turned Upside Down By Four Cells
2013-03-28 13:31:10

Aarhus University Single-celled archaea are invisible to the naked eye, and even when using a microscope, great care must be taken to observe them. An international team of researchers led by the Center for Geomicrobiology, Aarhus University, Denmark, has nevertheless succeeded in retrieving four archaeal cells from seabed mud and mapping the genome of each one. "Until now, nobody knew how these widespread mud-dwelling archaea actually live. Mapping the genome from the four archaeal...

First Evidence Of Life Deep Under Oceanic Crust Realized
2013-03-15 12:56:53

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Scientists writing in the journal Science say they have found the first direct evidence of life in the deeply buried oceanic crust. Researchers on board the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program's (IODP) research vessel JOIDES Resolution drilled a water depth of 1.5 miles and hundreds of feet of sediment into the oceanic crust off the west coast of North America. After examining rock samples from this depth, they were able to uncover...

Extreme Antarctic Bacteria May Hold Key To Life On Mars
2013-03-12 11:37:26

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online By studying microrganisms that thrive in the extreme environment of Antarctica, scientists from the University of Maryland have found new aspects of certain proteins that could enable life to function on Mars and in other extreme environments. According to their report in the journal BMC Biotechnology, the scientists found significant differences in the core proteins of Antarctic extremeophile bacteria known as Haloarchaea, when...

DNA Of Ancient Microorganisms Provide Clues On Origins Of Life
2013-03-08 11:41:26

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Important genetic clues about the history of a group of ancient microorganisms called archaea and the origins of life itself have been discovered by a team of researchers. Results of this first-of-its-kind study shed light on one of Earth's oldest life forms. "Archaea are an ancient form of microorganisms, so everything we can learn about them could help us to answer questions about the origin of life," explained William Whitman,...

Mysterious Microbial Community Unveiled Using Infrared Spectromicroscopy
2013-01-22 09:45:35

DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley Lab scientists join an international collaboration to understand how archaea and bacteria work together deep in a cold sulfur spring In the fall of 2010, Hoi-Ying Holman of the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) was approached by an international team researching a mysterious microbial community discovered deep in cold sulfur springs in southern Germany. "They told me what they were doing...


Word of the Day
kenspeckle
  • Having so marked an appearance as easily to be recognized.
This word may come from the Swedish 'kanspak,' quick at recognizing persons or things, or else from confusion with 'conspicuous.'