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Latest Archaean Stories

Next Supercontinent Could Be Formed Near North Pole
2012-02-09 06:13:38

All of Earth's continents, believed to have once been joined together as a supercontinent known as Pangaea, will be reunited as a single landmass near the North Pole within the next 50 million to 200 million years, researchers from Yale University claim in a new study. According to MSNBC Science Editor Alan Boyle, the Yale researchers, including geologist Ross Mitchell, used a computer model to determine the estimated location of the new supercontinent, which they have dubbed Amasia due to...

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2011-08-09 09:59:38

The Earth was a much different place 1.1 billion years ago. Researchers are discovering strong evidence that parts of what are now Texas and Antarctica were connected, according to Staci Loewy, a geochemist at California State University, Bakersfield. "I can go to the Franklin Mountains in West Texas and stand next to what was once part of Coats Land in Antarctica," says Loewy, "That's so amazing." Long before the supercontinent Pangaea formed, there were other landforms bouncing around on...

2008-08-13 12:00:51

Ur-Energy Inc. (TSX: URE) (AMEX: URG) ("Ur-Energy") announced today its quarterly conference call will be held on August 19, 2008 at 11 a.m. Eastern Time. Management will present the second quarter's results as well as future objectives. A Q&A session will follow management's presentation. This call is being webcast by ThomsonReuters and can be accessed at Ur-Energy's website at www.ur-energy.com or...

2008-08-07 06:00:34

By Steve Kuchera, Duluth News-Tribune, Minn. Aug. 7--IT DOESN'T LOOK EXTRAORDINARY -- but a rock found in Antarctica by a University of Minnesota Duluth professor is helping researchers reconstruct what a supercontinent that existed a billion years ago looked like. Analysis of the chunk of granite collected by UMD geology professor John Goodge in 2005 indicate that part of Antarctica and North America were joined 1.4 billion years ago. "We got really lucky -- I had no idea what we were...

2006-08-17 01:35:00

SYDNEY -- The island continent of Australia was once three continents which collided 1.64 billion years ago, a new study has found, prompting speculation of new mineral deposits in the outback. "Northern, western and central Australia all belonged to different continents," said Kate Selway, author of the study. "If you looked south from Alice Springs (in central Australia) before 1.64 billion years ago, you would have seen an ocean," Selway said in a statement on Thursday. "The huge forces...

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2006-02-07 06:55:00

NASA -- Scientists at the Carnegie Institution's Department of Plant Biology have found that photosynthetic bacteria living in scalding Yellowstone hot springs have two radically different metabolic identities. As the sun goes down, these cells quit their day job of photosynthesis and unexpectedly begin to fix nitrogen, converting nitrogen gas (N2) into compounds that are useful for cell growth. The study, published January 30 in the early online edition of the Proceedings of the National...

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2005-01-26 07:15:00

University of Chicago -- Experiments led by Nicolas Dauphas of the University of Chicago and Chicago's Field Museum have validated some controversial rocks from Greenland as the potential site for the earliest evidence of life on Earth. "The samples that I have studied are extremely controversial," said Dauphas, an Assistant Professor in Geophysical Sciences at the University of Chicago and a Field Museum Associate. Some scientists have claimed that these rocks from Greenland's banded iron...