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Latest Archaeological sites in Peru Stories

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2011-02-28 06:05:00

Archaeologists have discovered a group of nine ancient Peruvian tombs in the jungles of southern Cuzco province which they say could be as important as the discovery of Machu Picchu. The tombs, belonging to the Wari culture, were found at a long-abandoned city thought to be the last fortification of Inca resistance to Spanish colonial rule. The location of an ancient city in the Espiritu Pampa area means that the Wari civilization, which thrived from the sixth through the 13th centuries,...

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2011-02-22 11:10:00

Access to the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Peru's picturesque Inca city of Machu Picchu, suffering from a growing demand of tourists wishing to visit and access the site, must become limited to protect it, UNESCO chief Irina Bokova tells AFP. "Machu Picchu is a victim of its own success, because the interest is huge. But at the same time, for us and for the Peruvian people, there is an interest in protecting it," she told reporters after meeting with President Alan Garcia. In 2000, the World...

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2010-11-21 07:15:00

The president of Peru said Friday that Yale University has agreed to return thousands of artifacts that had been taken away from the Inca citadel of Machu Picchu almost a hundred years ago. Just hours after Peru's announcement, the university issued a statement expressing agreement with the results of its talks with Peru. The artifacts have been at the center of a long dispute for years, with Peru filing a lawsuit against the university in a US court. Peruvian president Alan Garcia said a...

2010-06-01 14:18:00

AUSTIN, Texas, June 1 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The nonprofit American Botanical Council (ABC) has announced its annual "Pharmacy from the Rainforest" Botanical Medicine Workshop and Ecotour, which will take place in Amazonian Peru and the majestic Andes Mountains, October 7-17, 2010. (Logo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20100430/DC95601LOGO) Since 1994, ABC has partnered with the Amazon Center for Education and Environmental Research (ACEER) to co-sponsor this exciting...

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2009-11-02 07:45:00

An ancient South American civilization which disappeared around 1,500 years ago helped to cause its own demise by damaging the fragile ecosystem that held it in place, a study has found. Archaeologists examining the remains of the Nasca, who once flourished in the valleys of south coastal Peru, have uncovered a sequence of human-induced events which led to their "catastrophic" collapse around 500 AD. The Nasca are probably best known for the famous "Nazca Lines", giant geoglyphs which they...

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2009-01-20 15:12:55

Researchers say that nature lashed out against civilization 3,600 years ago, by using earthquakes and floods, followed by blowing sand, which drove away residents of an area that is now in Peru. "This maritime farming community had been successful for over 2,000 years, they had no incentive to change, and then all of a sudden, boom, they just got the props knocked out from under them," anthropologist Mike Moseley of the University of Florida said in a statement. Moseley and other colleagues...

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2009-01-05 13:59:50

The mystery of why ancient South American peoples who created the mysterious Nazca Lines also collected human heads as trophies has long puzzled scholars who theorize the heads may have been used in fertility rites, taken from enemies in battle or associated with ancestor veneration. A recent study using specimens from Chicago's Field Museum throws new light on the matter by establishing that trophy heads came from people who lived in the same place and were part of the same culture as those...

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2008-12-18 08:15:00

Archaeologists exploring northern Peru's Cerro Patapo archaeological site have unearthed the ruins of an entire city, investigators said Tuesday. The discovery was made about 14 miles from the Pacific coast city of Chiclayo. The find, which likely dates to the Wari culture that existed in the area between 600-1100 AD, may provide the "missing link" between two ancient cultures, scientists said.  If the assumption holds true, the discovery would connect the ancient Wari civilization to...

2008-12-10 15:47:11

The government of Peru has sued Yale University in the U.S. courts seeking the return of Incan mummies, bones and pottery excavated decades ago. Hiram Bingham III, a Yale lecturer in South American history and future U.S. senator from Connecticut, rediscovered the city of Machu Picchu, high in the Andes, in 1911. The Peruvian lawsuit claims that many of the most significant artifacts Bingham removed from the site remain at Yale, violating his agreement with the government, The Hartford...

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2008-08-27 06:49:12

A mummy was unearthed Tuesday in Peru's Huaca Pucllana ruins, by archeologists who think the findings may have originated with the ancient Wari culture that flourished before the Incas. The tomb also contained the remains of two other adults and a child-who researchers believe was sacrificed.Researchers say the discovery is the first intact Wari burial site at Huaca Pucllana in the capital Lima."We'd discovered other tombs before," said Isabel Flores, director of the ruins. "But they always...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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