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Latest Archaeological sub-disciplines Stories

f09b637912b62b7254b0d110eb346f481
2010-01-19 11:56:19

The sediments of the Kimmeridge Clay Formation were deposited during the Late Jurassic between around 160 and 145 million years ago, the age of the reptiles. They are the main oil source rock in the North Sea. However, within this unit beds rich in organic matter are interspersed with organic-poor sediments. New evidence demonstrates that organic-poor sediments were probably caused by post-depositional loss of organic matter during so-called 'burn-down' events. The Kimmeridge Clay Formation...

9f6d3bc9f05965e844190086a835809e1
2009-12-15 10:51:34

The analysis of microfossils found in ocean sediment cores is illuminating the environmental conditions that prevailed at high latitudes during a critical period of Earth history. Around 55 million years ago at the beginning of the Eocene epoch, the Earth's poles are believed to have been free of ice. But by the early Oligocene around 25 million years later, ice sheets covered Antarctica and continental ice had developed on Greenland. "This change from greenhouse to icehouse conditions...

2c8a6db9518e70a11a7e86aa010dd368
2009-12-04 08:15:11

Isotope analysis provides accurate information The analysis of carbon and oxygen isotopes embedded in tree rings may shed new light on past climate events in the Mackenzie Delta region of northern Canada. Scientists have long looked at the width of tree rings to estimate temperature levels of past years. Larger rings indicate more tree growth in a season, which translates into warmer summer temperatures. But the analysis of carbon and oxygen isotopes in tree rings can also provide accurate...

2009-10-01 12:05:20

Palynomorphs from sediment core give proof to sudden warming in mid-Miocene era For Sophie Warny, LSU assistant professor of geology and geophysics and curator at the LSU Museum of Natural Science, years of patience in analyzing Antarctic samples with low fossil recovery finally led to a scientific breakthrough. She and colleagues from around the world now have proof of a sudden, remarkably warm period in Antarctica that occurred about 15.7 million years ago and lasted for a few thousand...

2009-07-30 11:14:01

 Scientists are comparing annual growth rings of the Pacific Northwest's largest bivalve and its most iconic tree for clues to how living organisms may have responded to changes in climate.Analyzed by themselves, the rings from a single tree or mollusk may sometimes reflect conditions that are either favorable or unfavorable for growth. When scientists look at numerous individuals of the same species, however, the consistency of the ring patterns allows them to build a model and compare...

2009-07-23 09:06:19

The Micropalaeontology team at the Department of Stratigraphy and Paleontology at the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU) is working on the study of microfossils under the direction of Mr Julio Rodríguez Lázaro. The concentrations of these types of fossils and the composition of their shells can provide much information about the conditions of life thousands or even millions of years ago. These microfossils once belonged to aquatic organisms and their analysis...

2009-06-04 12:20:00

Kat Exploration: Moving Exploration Forward MOUNT PEARL, NL, June 4 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ - Kat Exploration Inc. (OTC-Pink Sheet - KATX) is pleased to announce that on May15 - 2009 it began trading on the OTC-Pink Sheets. The listing will expand investment opportunities to a wider investor base, enhance liquidity of Kats shares, and provide the company with greater financing options to support its projects and sustain its expansion plans. This corporate milestone has caused great excitement...

41adbb02d7e5f83452ba076e552f15841
2009-05-26 15:17:08

New fossil findings discovered by scientists at UC Santa Barbara challenge prevailing views about the effects of "Snowball Earth" glaciations on life, according to an article in the June issue of the journal Nature Geoscience. By analyzing microfossils in rocks from the bottom of the Grand Canyon, the authors have challenged the view that has been generally assumed to be correct for the widespread die-off of early life on Earth. "Snowball Earth" is the popular term for glaciations that...

2008-09-24 21:00:13

A team of 20 volunteers started the community dig on Monday under the supervision of Cath Neal, of the university's archaeologydepartment.Over the next fortnight they will excavate the south of the site of a late Roman masonry building whose remains were unearthed by archaeologists earlier this year.The dig is close to where a 1,500 year-old skeleton was recently discovered.The volunteers are students on Higher York adult education courses and members of the Greater York Community Archaeology...

3d0a8268145c5a87bd2e6884d947510a1
2008-09-18 11:05:00

The skeleton of a man discovered by archaeologists in a shallow grave on the site of the University of York's campus expansion could be that of one of Britain's earliest victims of tuberculosis. Radiocarbon dating suggests that the man died in the fourth century. He was interred in a shallow scoop in a flexed position, on his right side. The man, aged 26"“35 years, suffered from iron deficiency anaemia during childhood and at 162 centimeters (5ft 4in), was a shorter height than average...


Latest Archaeological sub-disciplines Reference Libraries

Zooarchaeology
2013-09-30 13:29:48

Zooarchaeology is the study of animal remains including shells, bones, hides, scales, DNA, chitin, and hair. Shells and bones are most frequently studied because these do not decay at a fast rate, but most remains do not survive because they break or decompose. In eastern areas of North America, Zooarchaeology developed over three periods. The first, known as the Formative period, occurred in the 1860s and was not a specific area of study at that time. The second period, known as the...

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Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.