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Latest Archaeologists Stories

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2009-01-20 15:12:55

Researchers say that nature lashed out against civilization 3,600 years ago, by using earthquakes and floods, followed by blowing sand, which drove away residents of an area that is now in Peru. "This maritime farming community had been successful for over 2,000 years, they had no incentive to change, and then all of a sudden, boom, they just got the props knocked out from under them," anthropologist Mike Moseley of the University of Florida said in a statement. Moseley and other colleagues...

2006-01-04 07:33:51

LIMA, Peru -- In the Peru's Andean foothills, a group of archaeologists say they have found remnants of the oldest known irrigation canals in South America, which they hope will provide clues to the origin of the region's agriculturally based societies. "There are four sites in the area that have canals that date minimally 5,300 years ago, maybe a little earlier," team leader Tom D. Dillehay, an archaeologist at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, told The Associated Press....

2004-11-30 15:00:14

WHILE archaeology is the study of the past, today it is the future that is challenging those in the field. According to leading American-based archaeologist Professor Brian Fagan, if thinking about the future is not a priority then much of the past could well be lost. "Archaeology is changing and we really are at a turning point. Worldwide there is a lot of debate going on," said Prof Fagan who arrived in New Plymouth yesterday. He said it was vital archaeological sites and resources...