Quantcast
Microscopic Diamonds Suggest Cosmic Impact Responsible For

Microscopic Diamonds Suggest Cosmic Impact Responsible For Major Period Of Climate Change

Emily Murphy, University of Chicago Press A new study published in The Journal of Geology provides support for the theory that a cosmic impact event over North America some 13,000 years ago caused a major period of climate change known as the...

Latest Archaeology Stories

Flax yarn from wrappings
2014-08-14 04:47:30

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Mummies have always seemed to be from the distant past, but until now, we really didn't know how far into the past that was. A new study, published in PLOS ONE, demonstrates that Egyptians started mummifying their dead about 1,500 years earlier than previously thought. The findings are based on an 11-year study conducted by an international team of researchers from the University of York, Macquarie University and Oxford University....

2014-08-11 08:22:17

TAMPA, Fla., Aug. 11, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Seafarer Exploration Corporation (OTCQB: SFRX), a company focused on archeologically sensitive exploration, research and recovery of historic shipwrecks announced today that their first dive at a newly permitted shipwreck site near Cape Canaveral, FL has already yielded some very exciting artifacts. The site is believed to contain the remnants of a ship from the early colonial era (1500-1700) and artifacts retrieved during the first dive...

2014-08-08 23:03:57

Wolf brings senior level development experience to nationally-acclaimed nonprofit ending homelessness at its roots New York, NY (PRWEB) August 08, 2014 Dana L. Wolf, LCSW, MS, has been named Chief Development and Communications Officer at Jericho Project, a nationally-acclaimed nonprofit ending homelessness at its roots. Wolf brings a robust background in senior-level strategic development to Jericho, which has experienced consistent growth as an innovative and fiscally disciplined...

penn museum ancient skeleton
2014-08-07 06:24:14

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Anybody who has ever cleaned out a closet knows the feeling of finding some long-forgotten item, but scientists at the Penn Museum in Philadelphia have taken it to a next level – re-discovering a 6,500-year-old human skeleton that had been kept for decades in one of their own storage rooms. The skeleton, which is complete, has been stored in a coffin-like box for 85 years, its identifying documentation having all but vanished,...

2014-07-29 08:22:40

Solid silver artifacts already obtained from this site can be viewed at seafarercorp.com TAMPA, Fla., July 29, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Seafarer Exploration Corporation (OTCQB: SFRX), a company focused on archeologically sensitive exploration, research and recovery of historic shipwrecks is pleased to announce that Seafarer's Quest, LLC has successfully been granted a three year research permit for the shipwreck site south of Cape Canaveral from the Florida Bureau of Archaeology...

Earlier Stone Age Artifacts Discovered In Northern Cape Of South Africa
2014-07-28 03:31:41

University of Toronto Excavations at an archaeological site at Kathu in the Northern Cape province of South Africa have produced tens of thousands of Earlier Stone Age artifacts, including hand axes and other tools. These discoveries were made by archaeologists from the University of Cape Town (UCT), South Africa and the University of Toronto (U of T), in collaboration with the McGregor Museum in Kimberley, South Africa. The archaeologists’ research on the Kathu Townlands site, one...

Early Humans May Have Preyed On Elephant Ancestor Gomphothere
2014-07-15 12:58:30

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Gomphotheres, genetic relatives of the elephant, were thought to have roamed North America and became extinct long before humans reached the continent. But, according to a new study, researchers have uncovered evidence that North America’s earliest humans may have preyed on the ancient mammals. Published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, study researchers from the United States and Mexico found remains of...

birthplace of Neolithic agricultural practices
2014-06-09 04:52:57

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online By sequencing the mitochondrial DNA of the first Near Eastern farmers for the first time, an international team of researchers have discovered evidence supporting an Early Neolithic pioneer maritime colonization of mainland Europe that involved expansion through Cyprus and the Aegean Islands. Writing in the journal PLOS Genetics, the study authors explained their analysis of genetic samples obtained from three sites located in...

2014-06-07 23:02:54

Glyph, a leading global provider of translation and consulting services, today announced that they are exhibiting at IRCE in Chicago, the leading conference for Internet retailers. Glyph is exhibiting at booth 673 from June 10 – 13, 2014, and will be available to discuss translation services, global consulting, multimedia localization and internationalization. Madison, WI (PRWEB) June 07, 2014 Glyph, a leading global provider of translation and consulting services, today announced that...

2014-05-29 23:15:11

Powered by interactive gaming technology, a new touch-screen experience developed by Archaeology Southwest helps heritage tourists explore connections among thousand-year-old pueblos in northwestern New Mexico. Tucson, AZ (PRWEB) May 29, 2014 Now on display at Aztec Ruins National Monument and Salmon Ruins Museum, Chaco’s Legacy explores the rise and spread of a powerful ancient southwestern Pueblo society from New Mexico’s remote Chaco Canyon. Based in Archaeology Southwest’s...


Latest Archaeology Reference Libraries

Zooarchaeology
2013-09-30 13:29:48

Zooarchaeology is the study of animal remains including shells, bones, hides, scales, DNA, chitin, and hair. Shells and bones are most frequently studied because these do not decay at a fast rate, but most remains do not survive because they break or decompose. In eastern areas of North America, Zooarchaeology developed over three periods. The first, known as the Formative period, occurred in the 1860s and was not a specific area of study at that time. The second period, known as the...

More Articles (1 articles) »
Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
Related