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Early Humans May Have Preyed On Elephant Ancestor

Early Humans May Have Preyed On Elephant Ancestor Gomphothere

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Gomphotheres, genetic relatives of the elephant, were thought to have roamed North America and became extinct long before humans reached the continent. But, according to a new study,...

Latest Archaeology Stories

birthplace of Neolithic agricultural practices
2014-06-09 04:52:57

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online By sequencing the mitochondrial DNA of the first Near Eastern farmers for the first time, an international team of researchers have discovered evidence supporting an Early Neolithic pioneer maritime colonization of mainland Europe that involved expansion through Cyprus and the Aegean Islands. Writing in the journal PLOS Genetics, the study authors explained their analysis of genetic samples obtained from three sites located in...

2014-06-07 23:02:54

Glyph, a leading global provider of translation and consulting services, today announced that they are exhibiting at IRCE in Chicago, the leading conference for Internet retailers. Glyph is exhibiting at booth 673 from June 10 – 13, 2014, and will be available to discuss translation services, global consulting, multimedia localization and internationalization. Madison, WI (PRWEB) June 07, 2014 Glyph, a leading global provider of translation and consulting services, today announced that...

2014-05-29 23:15:11

Powered by interactive gaming technology, a new touch-screen experience developed by Archaeology Southwest helps heritage tourists explore connections among thousand-year-old pueblos in northwestern New Mexico. Tucson, AZ (PRWEB) May 29, 2014 Now on display at Aztec Ruins National Monument and Salmon Ruins Museum, Chaco’s Legacy explores the rise and spread of a powerful ancient southwestern Pueblo society from New Mexico’s remote Chaco Canyon. Based in Archaeology Southwest’s...

2014-05-29 10:40:27

University College London London's international fish trade can be traced back 800 years to the medieval period, according to new research published today in the journal Antiquity. The research, led by archaeologists from UCL, Cambridge and UCLan, provides new insight into the medieval fish trade and the globalisation of London's food supply. Archaeologists analysed data from nearly 3,000 cod bones found in 95 different excavations in and around London. They identified a sudden...

Study Questions Younger Dryas Event Comet Theories
2014-05-14 07:31:39

April Flowers for redOrbit.com – Your Universe Online Approximately 128,000 years ago, near the end of the last Ice Age, there was a brief episode of glacial conditions called the Younger Dryas event. The Younger Dryas, named for a flower that flourished during this time, lasted about 1,000 years. There has been quite a bit of controversy in the scientific community regarding what might have initiated the event—with a wide range of theories, including one that has the event caused by...

Nazca Lines in the Peruvian Desert
2014-05-06 09:22:42

Gerard LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study indicates that in ancient Peru residents formed lines of rock which may have directed people to fairs and trade sites around 300 B.C., reports Dan Vergano of National Geographic News. The Paracas people placed these piles of rock, with some stretching more than 1.9 miles, in the highlands and built ceremonial mounds near their homes along the Andean coast. This predates the famous Nazca lines by centuries. The Paracas...

Breakthrough On Understanding Demographic History Of Stone-Age Humans
2014-04-25 03:18:05

Uppsala University An international team led by researchers at Uppsala University and Stockholm University reports a breakthrough on understanding the demographic history of Stone-Age humans. A genomic analysis of eleven Stone-Age human remains from Scandinavia revealed that expanding Stone-age farmers assimilated local hunter-gatherers and that the hunter-gatherers were historically in lower numbers than the farmers. The study is published today, ahead of print, in the journal Science....

2014-03-26 23:00:12

Glyph Recognized as High-Performing Small Business Subcontractor by General Dynamics Information Technology Spokane, WA (PRWEB) March 26, 2014 Glyph Language Services announced today that it was recognized by General Dynamics Information Technology as a high-performing small subcontractor for their technical effort and performance during the previous year. The General Dynamics Information Technology Quality Service Provider (QSP) Program uses an established quality rating system and an...

Researchers Casting New Light On Diet Of Ancient Pacific Settlers
2014-03-06 13:48:55

University of Otago Researchers from New Zealand's University of Otago studying 3000-year-old skeletons from the oldest known cemetery in the Pacific Islands are casting new light on the diet and lives of the enigmatic Lapita people, the likely ancestors of Polynesians. Their results—obtained from analyzing stable isotope ratios of three elements in the bone collagen of 49 adults buried at the Teouma archaeological site on Vanuatu's Efate Island—suggest that its early Lapita...

The Rules Of Modern Development Also Applied To Ancient Settlements
2014-02-13 13:38:23

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online University of Colorado Boulder researchers, publishing a paper in the journal PLOS ONE, say ancient cities worked as well as modern urban areas. The team developed mathematical models describing how modern cities change as their populations grow and compared results with Aztec settlements in central Mexico. “This study suggests that there is a level at which every human society is actually very similar,” Scott Ortman, assistant...


Latest Archaeology Reference Libraries

Zooarchaeology
2013-09-30 13:29:48

Zooarchaeology is the study of animal remains including shells, bones, hides, scales, DNA, chitin, and hair. Shells and bones are most frequently studied because these do not decay at a fast rate, but most remains do not survive because they break or decompose. In eastern areas of North America, Zooarchaeology developed over three periods. The first, known as the Formative period, occurred in the 1860s and was not a specific area of study at that time. The second period, known as the...

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Word of the Day
bibliopole
  • A bookseller; now, especially, a dealer in rare and curious books.
This word comes from a Greek phrase meaning 'book seller.'
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