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Latest Archaeopteryx Stories

Feathered Dinosaurs May Have Been The Norm
2012-07-03 09:47:57

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online One of the most complete dinosaur fossils ever discovered suggests that feathered dinosaurs were more prevalent than previously thought and could have been the norm, not the exception. The 150 million-year-old fossil found in northern Bavaria shows that the dinosaur had down-like feathers over parts of its front and back as well on its tail. Scientists dubbed the creature Sciurumimus albersdoerferi after "Scirius”, the scientific...

New Research Shows Feathered Dinosaur Could Fly
2012-01-25 06:22:05

[ Watch the Video ] An international team of researchers led by Brown University has shed some new light on whether the winged dinosaur Archaeopteryx could fly. The team has determined that a well-preserved feather on the raven-sized dinosaur's wing was black, which is evidence that the feathers had traits that could help Archaeopteryx fly. Also, the researchers determined that the fossilized feather's structure is identical to living birds, according to the research published in the...

Image 1 - Killer Claws Help Provide New Theory On Evolution Of Flight
2011-12-16 03:57:20

New research from Montana State University's Museum of the Rockies has revealed how dinosaurs like Velociraptor and Deinonychus used their famous killer claws, leading to a new hypothesis on the evolution of flight in birds. In a paper published Dec. 14 in PLoS ONE, MSU researchers Denver W. Fowler, Elizabeth A. Freedman, John B. Scannella and Robert E. Kambic (now at Brown University in Rhode Island), describe how comparing modern birds of prey helped develop a new behavior model for...

2011-08-17 13:24:42

Five days after the Twin Towers collapsed, two geoscientists boarded a plane from Denver to New York City. They were part of a team that would use remote sensing techniques to categorize the hazards that might affect the rescue workers, civilians and survivors of the terrorist attacks. One of their immediate tasks involved identifying long-burning fires under the rubble. A second was to create a compositional profile of the debris cloud that resulted from the devastation. Part of the project...

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2011-07-28 04:55:00

Archaeopteryx, once believed to be the world's earliest bird, may actually have been just another feathered dinosaur, according to a report published Wednesday in the journal Nature. Researchers in China, led by Xing Xu of Linyi University, carried out a phylogenetic analysis combining a newly discovered fossil with other similar dinosaurs and early birds, and concluded that the species should no longer be considered a fully developed bird. If confirmed, the controversial hypothesis would be...

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2011-07-07 10:59:56

Pterosaurs, flying reptiles from the time of the dinosaurs, were not driven to extinction by the birds, but in fact they continued to diversify and innovate for millions of years afterwards. A new study by Katy Prentice, done as part of her undergraduate degree (MSci in Palaeontology and Evolution) at the University of Bristol, shows that the pterosaurs evolved in a most unusual way, becoming more and more specialized through their 160 million years on Earth. The work is published July 6 in...

2011-06-23 15:41:35

Why don't you ever see baby pigeons? For the same reason you don't see many chicks: they can't fly. It can take months for their partially developed wings and flight muscles to become airworthy, and by then the youngsters are almost fullygrown. However, long before their maiden flight, pigeon chicks probably put their developing wings to use, flapping as they run up steep branches. Brandon Jackson from the University of Montana, USA, explains that Ken Dial and his son first noticed this...

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2011-04-13 08:45:00

Birds are known in present time more for their vision and hearing than their sense of smell. However, a new study reveals that millions of years ago, their ancestors had a better sense for scents. Scientists at the University of Calgary, the Royal Tyrrell Museum and the Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine tested a long-standing view that the sense of smell for birds declined as they developed heightened senses of vision, hearing and balance for flight during evolution. The...

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2010-05-14 06:05:00

The earliest birds may have had feathers, but they were not strong enough to carry the winged creatures in flight, researchers revealed Thursday. Recent fossil discoveries show that feathers on some of the early birds, including Confuciusornis and Archaeopteryx, were too weak to support the birds in flight. While modern birds have feathers with a strong central shaft that is hollow to reduce weight, the earliest-known birds had feathers that were much thinner and more frail. Robert Nudds...

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2010-05-10 14:45:00

Researchers have found that a 150 million year old "dinobird" fossil, long thought to contain nothing but fossilized bone and rock, has been hiding remnants of the animal's original chemistry. Using the bright X-ray beam of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, located at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, an international team of paleontologists, geochemists and physicists has revealed this transformative glimpse into one of the most important fossils...


Latest Archaeopteryx Reference Libraries

2014-04-22 14:47:42

John Harold Ostrom (February 18, 1928 – July 16, 2005) was an American Paleontologist who was greatly influential in the revival of scientific research on Dinosaurs. He is best known for demonstrating that Dinosaurs were less like contemporary reptiles but more closely related to large, flightless birds like the ostrich – a theory that holds its ground in the paleontological community to this day. John Ostrom was born and raised in Schenectady, New York. His father was a physician, and...

630px-Sinosauropteryx_prima
2012-03-22 18:08:04

Sinosauropteryx, meaning “Chinese reptilian wing,” is a genus of theropod dinosaur from the Late Jurassic to the Early Cretaceous Period 135 to 121 million years ago. It was discovered in 1996 by two Chinese farmers in the dry countryside near Liaoning Province, China. The same area has also produced later on other bird-like dinosaur fossils including Caudipteryx and Protarchaeopteryx. Three complete skeletons of Sinosauropteryx have been found, including few samples of protofeathers,...

800px-Sinornithosaurus
2011-12-20 19:53:45

Sinornithosaurus, meaning “Chinese bird-lizard,” is a genus of feathered dromaeosaurid dinosaur from the early Aptian age of the Early Cretaceous Period (120 - 125 million years ago). It lived in what is now China and was the fifth non-avian feathered dinosaur discovered by 1999. It was discovered in the Jianshangou beds of the Yixian Formation, from the Sihetun locality of western Liaoning. Xu Xing, Wang Xiaolin and Wu Xiaochun, of the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology, Beijing are...

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Word of the Day
negawatt
  • A unit of saved energy.
Coined by Amory Lovins, chairman of the Rocky Mountain Institute as a contraction of negative watt on the model of similar compounds like megawatt.