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Latest Archaeopteryx Stories

2011-08-17 13:24:42

Five days after the Twin Towers collapsed, two geoscientists boarded a plane from Denver to New York City. They were part of a team that would use remote sensing techniques to categorize the hazards that might affect the rescue workers, civilians and survivors of the terrorist attacks. One of their immediate tasks involved identifying long-burning fires under the rubble. A second was to create a compositional profile of the debris cloud that resulted from the devastation. Part of the project...

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2011-07-28 04:55:00

Archaeopteryx, once believed to be the world's earliest bird, may actually have been just another feathered dinosaur, according to a report published Wednesday in the journal Nature. Researchers in China, led by Xing Xu of Linyi University, carried out a phylogenetic analysis combining a newly discovered fossil with other similar dinosaurs and early birds, and concluded that the species should no longer be considered a fully developed bird. If confirmed, the controversial hypothesis would be...

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2011-07-07 10:59:56

Pterosaurs, flying reptiles from the time of the dinosaurs, were not driven to extinction by the birds, but in fact they continued to diversify and innovate for millions of years afterwards. A new study by Katy Prentice, done as part of her undergraduate degree (MSci in Palaeontology and Evolution) at the University of Bristol, shows that the pterosaurs evolved in a most unusual way, becoming more and more specialized through their 160 million years on Earth. The work is published July 6 in...

2011-06-23 15:41:35

Why don't you ever see baby pigeons? For the same reason you don't see many chicks: they can't fly. It can take months for their partially developed wings and flight muscles to become airworthy, and by then the youngsters are almost fullygrown. However, long before their maiden flight, pigeon chicks probably put their developing wings to use, flapping as they run up steep branches. Brandon Jackson from the University of Montana, USA, explains that Ken Dial and his son first noticed this...

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2011-04-13 08:45:00

Birds are known in present time more for their vision and hearing than their sense of smell. However, a new study reveals that millions of years ago, their ancestors had a better sense for scents. Scientists at the University of Calgary, the Royal Tyrrell Museum and the Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine tested a long-standing view that the sense of smell for birds declined as they developed heightened senses of vision, hearing and balance for flight during evolution. The...

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2010-05-14 06:05:00

The earliest birds may have had feathers, but they were not strong enough to carry the winged creatures in flight, researchers revealed Thursday. Recent fossil discoveries show that feathers on some of the early birds, including Confuciusornis and Archaeopteryx, were too weak to support the birds in flight. While modern birds have feathers with a strong central shaft that is hollow to reduce weight, the earliest-known birds had feathers that were much thinner and more frail. Robert Nudds...

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2010-05-10 14:45:00

Researchers have found that a 150 million year old "dinobird" fossil, long thought to contain nothing but fossilized bone and rock, has been hiding remnants of the animal's original chemistry. Using the bright X-ray beam of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, located at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, an international team of paleontologists, geochemists and physicists has revealed this transformative glimpse into one of the most important fossils...

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2009-10-14 12:50:00

An international group of scientists have uncovered a new type of flying reptile, they reported on Tuesday. Writing in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, researchers from the University of Leicester, and the Geological Institute, Beijing documented evidence of a new type of pterosaur. Scientists said that the discovery fills in the large evolutionary gap between two different groups of pterosaurs: primitive long-tailed forms and their descendants, advanced...

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2009-10-09 12:25:00

Experts say new research reveals that the Archaeopteryx, which has long been viewed as the archetypal first bird, was actually a lot less "bird-like" than scientists originally thought. Archaeopteryx (from the Greek for "ancient wing"), lived 150 million years ago during the Late Jurassic period in what is now Germany. New microscopic images of the ancient cells and blood vessels inside the bones of the winged, feathered, claw-handed creature show unexpectedly slow growth and maturation that...

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2009-09-25 12:27:52

Fossil experts say the stunning remains of a "four-winged" dinosaur have confirmed that birds owe their ancestry to two-footed dinosaurs that lived millions of years ago, AFP reported. The well-preserved fossil of a bird-like dinosaur called Anchiornis huxleyi may be the deciding factor, according to Xing Xu of the Chinese Academy of Science in Beijing. Based on incomplete fossils, A. huxleyi was thought to have been a near contemporary of Archaeopteryx, the first recognized bird, which flew...


Latest Archaeopteryx Reference Libraries

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2012-03-22 18:08:04

Sinosauropteryx, meaning “Chinese reptilian wing,” is a genus of theropod dinosaur from the Late Jurassic to the Early Cretaceous Period 135 to 121 million years ago. It was discovered in 1996 by two Chinese farmers in the dry countryside near Liaoning Province, China. The same area has also produced later on other bird-like dinosaur fossils including Caudipteryx and Protarchaeopteryx. Three complete skeletons of Sinosauropteryx have been found, including few samples of protofeathers,...

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2011-12-20 19:53:45

Sinornithosaurus, meaning “Chinese bird-lizard,” is a genus of feathered dromaeosaurid dinosaur from the early Aptian age of the Early Cretaceous Period (120 - 125 million years ago). It lived in what is now China and was the fifth non-avian feathered dinosaur discovered by 1999. It was discovered in the Jianshangou beds of the Yixian Formation, from the Sihetun locality of western Liaoning. Xu Xing, Wang Xiaolin and Wu Xiaochun, of the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology, Beijing are...

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