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Latest Archean Stories

Signs Of Ancient Bacterial Ecosystems Found In Australia
2013-11-13 05:44:54

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists trying to reconstruct the rise of life during the period of Earth's history when it first evolved find the task daunting because the planet's oldest sedimentary rocks are not only rare, but nearly always altered by hydrothermal and tectonic activity. A new study, published in the journal Astrobiology, reveals the well-preserved remnants of a complex ecosystem in a nearly 3.5 billion-year-old sedimentary rock sequence in...

Young Sun Paradox Early Climate
2013-10-04 13:46:54

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online When life originated on Earth between 3.8 and 2.4 billion years ago during the Archean era, our sun was only functioning at about 75 percent of its current power. With this ‘low wattage’ sun, the Earth should have been covered in glaciers, yet scientists have found no evidence of this taking place. In a new study published recently by the journal Science, a team of international researchers’ analysis of rock samples dating back...

Early Earth Relied On Carbon To Keep Warm Enough For Life
2013-07-10 13:58:57

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online University of Colorado Boulder researchers have figured out how early Earth was warm enough to support life when the sun was 20 per cent dimmer than today. A new study determined that all that may have been required to sustain liquid water and primitive life on Earth during the Archean eon, 2.8 billion years ago, were the reasonable atmospheric carbon dioxide amounts believed to be present at the time and a little bit of methane....

Subduction Evidence From Billions Of Years Ago
2013-01-19 06:32:40

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers for the first time have discovered evidence supporting the theory that the processes that act as catalysts for volcanic activity today are similar to those that occurred nearly four billion years ago. Writing in the journal Geology, Frances Jenner of the Carnegie Institution for Science and colleagues report that 3.8 billion-year-old volcanic rocks recovered from an island in southwestern Greenland support previous...

2012-09-19 16:11:40

New Geology articles posted online ahead of print 4—18 September 2012 Highlights are provided below. Geology articles published ahead of print can be accessed online at http://geology.gsapubs.org/content/early/recent. All abstracts are open-access at http://geology.gsapubs.org/; representatives of the media may obtain complimentary Geology articles by contacting Kea Giles at the address above. Please discuss articles of interest with the authors before publishing stories on...

Melting Mantle Linked To Great Oxygenation Event 2.5 Billion Years Ago
2012-05-25 04:38:16

Brett Smith for RedOrbit.com Oxygen-based life evolved on Earth because of geological events that occurred over 2.5 million years ago, according to Princeton University researchers who published a report this week in the online journal Nature. Based on geological evidence, scientists know that roughly 2.5 billion years ago, oxygen levels in the atmosphere exploded and eventually gave birth to our present atmosphere. This time period, dubbed the Great Oxygenation Event (GOE), appears to...

2011-05-18 16:07:56

Carbon found within ancient rocks has played a crucial role developing a time line for the emergence of biological life on the planet billions of years ago. But applying cutting-edge technology to samples of ancient rocks from northern Canada has revealed the carbon-based minerals may be much younger than the rock they inhabit, a team of researchers report in the latest edition of the journal Nature Geoscience. The team "“ which includes researchers from Boston College, the Carnegie...

109fe96495c0817eeef9ded1cbca5f751
2010-12-20 06:20:00

Life on Earth began to flourish about 3 billion years ago, possibly when primitive forms developed efficient ways to harness energy from the Sun's light, according to a new study published in the journal Nature on Sunday. Scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) built a "genomic fossil" -- a mathematical model that took 1,000 key genes that exist today -- and calculated how they evolved from the very distant past. The collective genome of all life expanded massively...

392bd8765887a8f423852e8c75c6487e
2009-11-11 13:45:00

The scalding-hot sea that supposedly covered the early Earth may in fact never have existed, according to a new study by Stanford University researchers who analyzed isotope ratios in 3.4 billion-year-old ocean floor rocks. Their findings suggest that the early ocean was much more temperate and that, as a result, life likely diversified and spread across the globe much sooner in Earth's history than has been generally theorized. It also means that the chemical composition of the ancient ocean...


Latest Archean Reference Libraries

Geologic Clock With Events And Periods
2012-10-22 14:17:38

The Archean (formerly Archaeozoic) is a geologic eon between the Hadean and Proterozoic eons. The Archean Eon begins at roughly 3.8 billion years ago (Ga) and ends at about 2.5 Ga. But unlike all other geological ages, which are based on stratigraphy, The Archean eon is defined chronometrically. The lower boundary of 3.8 Ga has also not been officially recognized by the International Commission on Stratigraphy. The name Archean is derived from the ancient Greek (Arkhe), meaning...

Volcano_q
2012-06-26 19:51:17

The Hadean is the unofficial geological period of time that lies just before the Archean time period. The Hadean began with the formation of the Earth roughly 4.5 billion years ago (Ga) and ended about 3.8 Ga; the latter date varies according to different sources. Hadean is derived from Hades, Greek for “underworld,” referring to the hellish conditions on the planet at the time. The term was coined in 1972 by geologist Preston Cloud. The period was later classified as the “Priscoan...

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Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.