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Latest Arctic haze Stories

2009-12-15 16:35:00

HAMPTON, Va., Dec. 15 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A NASA field campaign to study man-made and natural influences on the Arctic atmosphere delivered a collection of rare data that is illuminating the impact of industrial pollution from Europe and Asia, and smoke and soot from agricultural and forest fires. (Logo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO) NASA's first in-depth airborne campaign to sample the Arctic atmosphere in years, the Atmospheric Composition of the...

2009-10-06 14:14:08

"Blue haze," a common occurrence that appears over heavily forested areas around the world, is formed by natural emissions of chemicals, but human activities can worsen it to the point of affecting the world's weather and even cause potential climate problems, according to a study led by a Texas A&M University researcher. Renyi Zhang, professor of atmospheric sciences who has studied air chemistry for more than 20 years, says blue haze (tiny particles or aerosols suspended in the air) can...

2009-09-11 10:52:27

Much of circumpolar Arctic research focuses on the physical, direct changes resulting from climate warming such as sea ice retreat and temperature increases. "What's understudied is the living component of the Arctic and that includes humans," said Syndonia "Donie" Bret-Harte, associate professor of biology at the University of Alaska Fairbanks and co-author of a paper to be published September 11, 2009 in the journal Science. The paper reviews current knowledge on the ecological consequences...

2008-06-16 12:00:05

The U.S. space agency says it will soon begin the final weeks of a program studying the effect forest fires have on Arctic climate. Starting June 29, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration said its aircraft will begin following the trail of smoke plumes from some of Earth's northernmost forest fires, examining their contribution to arctic pollution and implications for climate change. NASA's DC-8 and P-3B aircraft, based at a Canadian military base in Cold Lake, Alberta, will...

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2008-06-12 15:10:00

As the summer fire season heats up, NASA aircraft are set to follow the trail of smoke plumes from some of Earth's northernmost forest fires, examining their contribution to arctic pollution and implications for climate change.Starting June 29, NASA's DC-8 and P-3B aircraft, based at a Canadian military base in Cold Lake, Alberta, will begin their final three-week deployment of the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites, or ARCTAS, mission. A third...

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2008-04-23 00:50:00

Although carbon dioxide and greenhouse gases are known to be the root cause of global warming, scientists have set out in government research planes to determine if airborne particles known as aerosols are also causing the rise in Arctic temperatures.Using technology such as mass spectroscopy, a technique that is used to find the composition of a physical sample, researchers hope to identify the components of the Arctic haze as well as discover where it came from and how it interacts with the...

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2008-04-01 10:55:00

WASHINGTON -- This month, NASA begins the most extensive field campaign ever to investigate the chemistry of the Arctic's lower atmosphere. The mission is poised to help scientists identify how air pollution contributes to climate changes in the Arctic. The recent decline of sea ice is one indication the Arctic is undergoing significant environmental changes related to climate warming. NASA and its partners plan to investigate the atmosphere's role in this climate-sensitive region with the...

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2008-03-19 08:15:00

Study: Early explorers saw particulate haze in late 1800sScientists know that air pollution particles from mid-latitude cities migrate to the Arctic and form an ugly haze, but a new University of Utah study finds surprising evidence that polar explorers saw the same phenomenon as early as 1870."The reaction from some colleagues "“ when we first mentioned that people had seen haze in the late 1800s "“ was that it was crazy," says Tim Garrett, assistant professor of meteorology and...

2005-09-25 03:20:41

By Yereth Rosen ANCHORAGE, Alaska (Reuters) - Spring snowmelt in Alaska's Arctic is occurring progressively earlier, accelerating the region's climate change and helping produce its warmest summers in at least 400 years, according to a new study. The earlier snowmelt, itself a product of a warming climate, is one of the "positive feedback" factors that accelerates warming in the far north, said Terry Chapin, a professor of ecology at the University of Alaska Fairbanks' Institute of...


Latest Arctic haze Reference Libraries

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2009-07-06 17:01:44

Arctic haze is a phenomenon that occurs in the atmosphere at high latitudes in the Arctic due to air pollution. What distinguishes Arctic haze from haze found elsewhere, is the ability of its chemical ingredients to endure in the atmosphere for a longer period of time compared to other pollutants. Due to limited snowfall, rain, or turbulent air to displace pollutants from the polar air in the spring, Arctic haze can continue for more than a month in the northern atmosphere. Arctic haze was...

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2009-07-06 16:44:13

Haze is a type of atmospheric phenomenon where dust, smoke and dry particles in the air obscure the sky's clarity. Haze is created through various activities including farming, traffic pollution,and even wildfires. The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) categorizes the obscuration of the Earth's atmosphere by a list of different types of atmospheric phenomena. One of these is haze. The other classifications are: fog, ice fog, steam fog, mist, smoke, volcanic ash, dust, sand, and snow....

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Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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