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NASA Scientists Watching Studying Arctic Changes This Summer

NASA Scientists Watching, Studying Arctic Changes This Summer

Patrick Lynch, NASA’s Earth Science News Team As we near the final month of summer in the Northern Hemisphere, NASA scientists are watching the annual seasonal melting of the Arctic sea ice cover. The floating, frozen cap that stretches...

Latest Arctic Stories

Snow on top of sea ice
2014-08-14 03:30:55

George Hale, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Over the past few decades, Arctic sea ice has been retreating, and although research shows a downward trend in snow on land in the Arctic, long-term measurements of snow depth on sea ice have been less clear. But now, new research using data from NASA's Operation IceBridge shows that snow depth on Arctic sea ice has been decreasing over the past several decades, a trend largely owing to later sea ice freeze-up dates in the Arctic. Arctic...

Finding Deepest Iceberg Scours To Date Provides New Insights Into Arctic’s Glacial Past
2014-08-13 03:02:09

Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research Scientists from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI), have found between Greenland and Spitsbergen the scours left behind on the sea bed by gigantic icebergs. The five lineaments, at a depth of 1,200 meters, are the lowest-lying iceberg scours yet to be found on the Arctic sea floor. This finding provides new understanding of the dynamics of the Ice Age and the extent of...

Arctic Mammals Can Metabolize Some Pesticides: Study
2014-08-08 03:33:01

University of Guelph Fortunately, you are not always what you eat – at least in Canada’s Arctic. New research from the University of Guelph reveals that arctic mammals such as caribou can metabolize some current-use pesticides (CUPs) ingested in vegetation. This limits exposures in animals that consume the caribou – including humans. “This is good news for the wildlife and people of the Arctic who survive by hunting caribou and other animals,” said Adam Morris, a PhD...

sea ice off alaska
2014-07-31 03:00:56

Hannah Hickey, University of Washington As the climate warms and sea ice retreats, the North is changing. An ice-covered expanse now has a season of increasingly open water that is predicted to extend across the whole Arctic Ocean before the middle of this century. Storms thus have the potential to create Arctic swell – huge waves that could add a new and unpredictable element to the region. A University of Washington researcher made the first study of waves in the middle of the...

2014-07-17 16:20:28

Luxury Cruise to Embark on Unprecedented 32-day Arctic Expedition LOS ANGELES, July 17, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- The "World's Best" Crystal Cruises is introducing a new expedition-style voyage traversing the Arctic Ocean via the legendary Northwest Passage - one so mysterious and remote (500 miles north of the Arctic Circle), that explorers spent centuries seeking the passage, until it was first completed successfully by Roald Amundsen just over 100 years ago....

Satellite Imagery A Promising Tool To Monitor Arctic Polar Bears
2014-07-10 03:14:50

PLOS Polar bear population estimates based on satellite images are similar to aerial estimates, according to a study published July 9, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Seth Stapleton from United States Geological Survey and colleagues. The potentially severe impacts of climate change in the Arctic may threaten regional wildlife. Scientists trying to develop efficient and effective wildlife monitoring techniques to track Arctic populations face great challenges, including the...

Better Understanding Arctic Climate Change Based On Shark Teeth
2014-07-10 08:44:06

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Today, polar bears and other animals adapted to extremely cold environments inhabit the Arctic tundra. In the past, around 53 to 38 million years ago (the Eocene epoch), the Arctic was not a frozen tundra -- rather, it was more like a huge temperate forest with brackish water. This forest was home to a wide variety of wildlife, including the ancestors of modern-day tapirs, hippo-like creatures, crocodiles and giant tortoises....

modern day sand tiger shark
2014-07-01 05:12:56

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Most sharks today are strictly saltwater fish, however, a new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder and the University of Chicago reveals that this was not the case 50 million years ago. Sharks in the Arctic Ocean during this time lived in brackish water, with approximately the same amount of freshwater found in modern day Lake Ponchatrain in Louisiana. The study, led by University of Chicago postdoctoral researcher Sora...

Study Shows Earlier Snowmelt Is Prompting Arctic Birds To Breed Earlier
2014-06-26 03:37:52

Wildlife Conservation Society WCS study shows earlier spring seasons brought about by climate change causing long-distance migrants to breed sooner A new collaborative study that included the work of Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) biologists has revealed that migratory birds that breed in Arctic Alaska are initiating nests earlier in the spring, and that snowmelt occurring earlier in the season is a big reason why. The report, "Phenological advancement in arctic bird species:...

Arctic Amplification Has Reduced Risk Of Extreme Cold Weather
2014-06-16 04:41:53

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Despite the fact that many parts of the United States experienced extremely cold conditions this past winter, the risk of such conditions increasing as a result of climate change is unlikely, according to research appearing in the latest edition of Nature Climate Change. Study author Dr. James Screen of the University of Exeter reports that the Arctic amplification phenomenon, which refers to the increased warming rate experienced...


Latest Arctic Reference Libraries

Alaskan Hare, Lepus othus
2014-05-19 10:40:26

The Alaskan hare (Lepus othus), or the tundra hare, can be found on the Alaskan Peninsula and in western areas of Alaska. This species prefers to reside in rocky areas in their tundra habitat, resting in open areas rather than in burrows. It is most closely related to the mountain hare and the Arctic hare. Members of this species reach an average weight between 1.6 and 2.2 feet, with hind feet that reach a length of 7.9 inches. The hind feet are thought to help the hares move quickly and...

Arctic Ocean
2013-04-18 22:31:23

The Arctic Ocean which is located in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Arctic north polar region, is the shallowest and smallest of the world’s five major oceanic divisions. The International Hydrographic Organization recognizes it as an ocean, although, some oceanographers consider it as the Arctic Mediterranean Sea or simply, the Arctic Sea, classifying it a Mediterranean sea or an estuary of the Atlantic Ocean. Alternatively, the Arctic Ocean can be considered as the northernmost...

Weather Reference Library
2012-07-05 11:03:14

Continental arctic air mass is known for its very frigid and dry air. The most common place in the United States to find this air mass is in Alaska. However, in the coldest parts of the winter such as December and January along with early February it is not uncommon for this air mass to invade the Northern part of the United States. This air mass is responsible for bringing with it temps that drop well below zero. Along with the cold temps the air is very dry and if people stay outside in...

22_1663f68fda000d8f11d5a4317e325607
2009-07-06 17:01:44

Arctic haze is a phenomenon that occurs in the atmosphere at high latitudes in the Arctic due to air pollution. What distinguishes Arctic haze from haze found elsewhere, is the ability of its chemical ingredients to endure in the atmosphere for a longer period of time compared to other pollutants. Due to limited snowfall, rain, or turbulent air to displace pollutants from the polar air in the spring, Arctic haze can continue for more than a month in the northern atmosphere. Arctic haze was...

38_b3a419149afd3560451ccb1956bc5b37
2007-10-24 15:45:58

The Common Redpoll (Carduelis flammea), is a species in the finch family. It breeds throughout northern North America and Eurasia. Subspecies of the Common Redpoll include the Arctic Redpoll and Mealy Redpoll. These are common too in the Arctic, Iceland, Greenland, and Baffin Island. They all migrate south into southern Canada, northern United States and most of Eurasia. These birds are remarkably resistant to cold temperatures and winter migration is mainly due to lack of food rather...

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