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Latest Argentine Antarctica Stories

Satellite Observes Rapid Ice Shelf Disintegration In Antarctic
2012-04-06 04:16:49

As ESA´s Envisat satellite marks ten years in orbit, it continues to observe the rapid retreat of one of Antarctica´s ice shelves due to climate warming. One of the satellite´s first observations following its launch on 1 March 2002 was of break-up of a main section of the Larsen B ice shelf in Antarctica — when 3200 sq km of ice disintegrated within a few days due to mechanical instabilities of the ice masses triggered by climate warming. Now, with ten years of...

Invasive Species Put Antarctic Natives At Risk
2012-03-06 11:15:04

As temperatures warm along Antarctica´s outer fringes, it allows for invasive plants and organisms to be carried in inadvertently by visiting scientists and tourists, putting the pristine ecosystem at risk, researchers have found. An international team of researchers, writing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), said they scoured the clothes and boots of those visiting the southernmost continent and found that most were carrying plant seeds. The risks from...

2011-07-26 16:51:00

PHILADELPHIA, July 26, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- On Tuesday, July 26, 2011, the Reverend Luis Cortes, Jr. returned from London, England, where he was a guest of The Honorable Right Reverend James Jones, Bishop of Liverpool, at a consultation concerning environmental issues, climate change, and sustainable agriculture. Reverend Cortes engaged in discussion about climate change and sustainability with a focus on how to connect Hispanic communities to the issue. Reverend Cortes was...

2009-08-31 14:45:00

LOS ANGELES, Aug. 31 /PRNewswire/ -- In an industry first, Crystal Cruises is offering just six intrepid holiday travelers a new two-day excursion to the windiest, coldest and least populated continent on the planet. (Photo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20090831/LA68374) In below freezing temperatures, the brand new rugged and rare overland excursion will take Crystal guests to King George Island, Antarctica. Brave adventurers will trek through remote villages and a petrified...

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2009-01-26 14:35:00

Researchers have found evidence to suggest that many creatures common to Antarctica may be threatened by even the slightest temperature increase. The creatures, such as Antarctic sea spiders, limpets or sea urchins are among the least studied on the face of the earth. Even a rise of 2 or 3 degrees Celsius could result in life-threatening conditions, Simon Morley, a marine biologist at the British Antarctic Survey at Rothera, told Reuters. "Because this is one of the most rapidly warming...

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2009-01-25 15:05:00

On Antarctic research bases, chefs rely on imported and often frozen food in order to feed crewmembers. The 1959 Antarctic Treaty sets aside the continent as a nature reserve devoted to peace and science and bases have, over the years, stopped eating fresh wildlife. Fresh seal brains, penguin eggs or grilled cormorant were once considered the "delicacies of the Antarctic," but are now off the menu. "You have to use what you've got in the store. Frozen stuff, tinned stuff and if you're really...

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2009-01-21 13:10:00

President Barack Obama's inauguration on Tuesday was a major cause for celebration by U.S. geologists working in Antarctica, who praise the Obama administration's stronger focus on science. David Barbeau, assistant professor of geology at the University of South Carolina, told Reuters it is a very exciting time for his crew, as they watched the inauguration at the British Rothera research station on the Antarctic Peninsula. "There certainly is a feeling that this administration will have...

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2009-01-19 08:20:00

Warm, snow-free airstrips in Antarctica have attracted some unwelcome visitors, a group of birds that are now a dangerous threat to planes. Air traffic experts are looking for ways to scare off the south polar skuas, a large and aggressive brown seabird, without harming them. Currently, the birds are protected by the 47-nation Antarctic Treaty, which declares the frozen continent a nature reserve. At the British Rothera research station on the Antarctic Peninsula, about 100 skuas often...

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2009-01-15 13:57:15

Harsh weather, remoteness and even elephant seals in Antarctica can become an obstacle for people living on the continent. On Wednesday, a group of seals lying on the beach delayed what should have been a simple repair of a nearby hut. "You're not supposed to interfere with the seals. So I just make myself a nuisance and hope they'll move on," said John Loines, 56, of the British Antarctic Survey (BAS). "It can be intimidating but they usually do move." Loines attempted to repair the...

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2009-01-13 16:50:41

Scientists say the Antarctic Peninsula's most fearsome land predator is a reddish bug called the Rhagidia mite. Although the continent is best known for penguins, seals and whales, the tiny mite is considered it's top predator. Now researchers are stepping up their study of these miniscule creatures in Antarctica for possible early warnings about how climate change may disrupt life around the planet in coming decades. Pete Convey, a biologist at the British Antarctic Survey, said Antarctica...


Latest Argentine Antarctica Reference Libraries

Antarctic Silverfish, Pleuragramma antarcticum
2012-04-02 17:14:35

The Antarctic Silverfish, (Pleuragramma antarcticum), is a member of the Notothenioidei family of fish. It is widely distributed around the Antarctic, but has largely disappeared from the western side of the northern Antarctic Peninsula based on 2010 research funded by the National Science Foundation. It is also found throughout the Southern Ocean. It grows to an average size of 6 inches, but has been known to reach lengths of up to 10 inches. It is usually pink with a silver tint, and...

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Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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