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Latest Aromatase inhibitor Stories

2008-08-13 06:00:18

By Liz Szabo Women who survive five years after being diagnosed with breast cancer have a good chance of remaining cancer-free, a new study shows. In the most detailed study of its kind, the report shows that 89% of such patients remain disease-free 10 years after diagnosis, and 81% are cancer-free after 15 years. Authors of the study, published online Tuesday in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, say their findings may reassure breast cancer survivors, many of whom...

2008-07-17 09:00:19

ANN ARBOR, Mich., July 17 /PRNewswire/ -- Meditrina Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced the approval of its second investigational new drug (IND) application for a Phase IIb dose ranging clinical trial to study MPI-676, the Company's aromatase inhibitor (AI), in combination with estrogen and progestin for the treatment of endometriosis. MPI-676 is the newest addition to Meditrina's clinical stage product portfolio that currently includes Femathina(TM) (MPI-674), an AI that Meditrina is...

2008-07-15 12:01:01

Amgen has reported positive results from a three-year pivotal Phase III placebo-controlled trial evaluating denosumab in the treatment of bone loss in men undergoing androgen deprivation therapy for non-metastatic prostate cancer. In this study of more than 1,400 men, denosumab treatment produced statistically significantly greater increases in bone mineral density (BMD) at the lumbar spine (primary endpoint) and non-vertebral sites compared with placebo at multiple time points. These...

2008-06-16 09:00:10

SAN FRANCISCO and EMERYVILLE, Calif., June 16 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Bionovo Inc. today announced results from animal studies of its drug candidate, VG101. The data were presented at the Endocrine Society's 90th Annual Meeting in San Francisco, and showed that in animal models, VG101, an estrogen receptor beta selective modulator, is safe and effective for the treatment of vaginal atrophy or "vaginal dryness." "Vaginal dryness occurs in over 50% of menopausal women, resulting in long...

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2008-03-06 08:15:00

PHILADELPHIA "“ Women whose breast cancer came back after treatment had almost twice as much estrogen in their blood than did women who remained cancer-free "“ despite treatment with anti-estrogen drugs in a majority of the women "“ according to researchers in a study published in the March issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. The findings suggest that high levels of estrogen contribute to an...

2006-06-15 11:25:00

By Amy Norton NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Being overweight in young adulthood or later in life may raise a woman's risk of ovarian cancer, particularly if she's never had children, researchers have found. In a study of 2,110 women with and without ovarian cancer, researchers found that those who were relatively heavy, either in recent years or at the age of 18, were more likely than thinner women to develop the disease. But the relationship between weight and ovarian cancer was strongest...

2006-04-18 11:30:00

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The osteoporosis drug Evista works as well as tamoxifen in reducing the risk of breast cancer in high-risk older women, with fewer dangerous side effects, researchers said on Monday. Both drugs reduce the risk of breast cancer in high-risk women past menopause by about 50 percent, the researchers said. And the results of the 19,000-woman trial show that Eli Lilly and Co's Evista, known generically as raloxifene, is less...

2005-10-18 08:39:31

By Martha Kerr NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Chemotherapy with drugs called aromatase inhibitors is unnecessary after lumpectomy, radiation and 5 years of tamoxifen for the vast majority of women with breast cancer, researchers reported at the annual meeting of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiation and Oncology in Denver. Principal researcher Dr. Gary Freedman, of Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, presented results of a study of 471 women diagnosed with breast cancer....

2005-09-09 18:22:55

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Why do estrogen-dependent breast-cancer cells grow and spread rapidly? Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign say it may be because estrogen virtually eliminates levels of a vitally important regulatory protein. In a paper that will appear in the Sept. 13 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the scientists report that human breast-cancer cells exposed to estrogen in their laboratory showed a dramatic reduction in numbers of a...

2005-08-10 00:33:57

MONTREAL  August 10, 2005 - Scientists at the MUHC have made an important discovery that will advance our understanding of how the female hormone estrogen causes growth of breast cancer cells. The research, in collaboration with scientists at the Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montreal (IRCM) identifies 153 genes that respond to estrogen and one in particular that can be used to halt the growth of breast cancer cells. The study, published in today's Proceedings of the National...


Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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