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Latest Artemisinin Stories

2012-01-17 22:35:12

In future it should be possible to produce the best anti-malaria drug, artemisinin, more economically and in sufficient volumes for all patients The most effective anti-malaria drug can now be produced inexpensively and in large quantities. This means that it will be possible to provide medication for the 225 million malaria patients in developing countries at an affordable price. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces in Potsdam and the Freie...

2011-12-13 14:51:49

The largest ever study to assess the effects of malaria and its treatment in the first trimester of pregnancy has shown that the disease significantly increases the risk of miscarriage, but that treating with antimalarial drugs is relatively safe and reduces this risk. In the study, carried out at the Shoklo Malaria Research Unit (SMRU), in Thailand and funded by the Wellcome Trust, researchers examined medical records of women attending the unit's antenatal clinic over the 25 years since...

Breakthrough In The Battle Against Malaria
2011-11-30 05:54:45

Study identifies new ways to kill the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum An international team of scientists has announced a breakthrough in the fight against malaria, paving the way for the development of new drugs to treat the deadly disease. According to the World Health Organisation malaria currently infects more than 225 million people worldwide and accounts for nearly 800,000 deaths per year. Most deaths occur among children living in Africa where a child dies every 45...

2011-11-09 10:05:25

For some time now, artemisinin, derived from a Chinese herb, has been the most powerful treatment available against malaria. To avoid the malaria parasite becoming resistant, the World Health Organisation (WHO) strongly recommends combining artemisinin with another anti-malarial drug. But there are different formulations and derivatives, in different combinations and with dosing schemes. Scientists from the Institute of Tropical Medicine (ITM) carried out a head-to-head comparison of four...

2011-11-09 09:59:16

A large study from Africa, published in this week's PLoS Medicine, has found that in a direct comparison, three types of new, fast-acting antimalarial artemisinin-based combination therapy drugs (ACTs), which comprise artemisinin derivatives in combination with a partner antimalarial drug, AL (artesunate—mefloquine), ASAQ (artesunate—amodiaquine) and DHAPQ (dihydroartemisinin—piperaquine) are all effective for treating children with uncomplicated malaria. In a randomized...

2011-10-25 20:06:23

Researchers at the University of South Florida (USF) College of Public College Health have shown for the first time in a rodent model that the earliest form of malaria parasites can lay dormant in red blood cells and “wake up,” or recover, following treatment with the antimalarial drug artesunate. The study, which appears today in the online journal PLoS ONE, suggests that this early-stage dormancy phenomenon contributes to the failure of artesunate alone, or even combined with...

2011-09-01 11:58:38

An investigation into the mysterious inner workings of the malaria parasite has revealed that it survives and proliferates in the human bloodstream thanks in part to a single, crucial chemical that the parasite produces internally. According to scientists at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and Stanford Medical School, reporting today in the journal PLoS Biology, this insight immediately provides a powerful new tool for discovering and designing drugs to treat malaria,...

2011-08-31 12:39:54

A novel technique to "tame" the malaria parasite, by forcing it to depend on an external supply of a vital chemical, has been developed by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and the University of California-San Francisco. The scientists have, in effect, created a domesticated strain of Plasmodium – the one-celled parasite that causes malaria – that would no longer cause this dreaded disease. Their findings not only make it possible to grow large volumes...


Word of the Day
abrosia
  • Wasting away as a result of abstinence from food.
The word 'abrosia' comes from a Greek roots meaning 'not' and 'eating'.