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Latest Arthropod Stories

Lyrarapax unguispinus
2014-07-17 09:18:38

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Approximately 520 million years ago, during the Lower Cambrian, the world's oldest known predator lived beneath the ocean's surface. An international team of scientists has identified what they call "an exquisitely preserved" brain in the fossil of a group of animals known as anomalocaridids, or "abnormal shrimp." The researchers were surprised to find that the brain of this predator was less complex than those found in fossils of some...

Predatory Characteristics Of Extinct Sea Scorpion Reexamined
2014-07-11 10:42:07

Gerard LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientist from Yale University studied the extinct pterygotid eurypterid, a giant sea scorpion, the largest arthropod that ever lived. It was always believed to be a fierce predator, but a recent study revealed that may not have been the case. The paper titled, “What big eyes you have: The ecological role of giant pterygotid eurypterids,” is published in the journal Biology Letters. Ross Anderson, a Yale graduate student and...

artists reconstruction of Tamisiocaris borealis
2014-03-27 09:19:17

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Several large marine animals have evolved from fearsome predators to become gentle giants that use filtering appendages to ingest food, and new research from a team of European researchers has revealed a similar evolution in a group of predators that roamed the oceans 520 million years ago during the Early Cambrian. According to the team’s report in the journal Nature, an early arthropod called Tamisiocaris borealis used large curly...

Ecological Impacts Linked To Poorly Camouflaged Walking Sticks
2013-10-22 06:31:29

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers studying the evolution of a California walking stick into two separate, distinct forms have found that such rapid changes in a creature’s appearance can set off a chain of ecological impacts. Investigators from the Univeristy of Colorado at Boulder and the University of Helsinki report that the evolution of the species Timema cristinae resulted in two unique individuals – one that is all green in color and well...

Extinct Arthropod Had Big Claws Spider Brain
2013-10-16 15:15:35

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online While finding an intact fossil of any kind can be an exciting discovery, an international team of paleontologists recently discovered the earliest known complete nervous system in the fossil of a never-before described creature that crawled or swam in the ocean some 520 million years ago, according to a report in the journal Nature. The researchers said the fossil belongs to an extinct group of marine arthropods known as megacheirans,...

No Single Factor Behind Cambrian Explosion Of Animal Life
2013-09-20 07:58:01

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study from the UK reveals that the explosion of animal life on Earth that occurred around 520 million years ago was the result of a combination of interlinked factors, rather than a single underlying cause. Over the past few decades, dozens of individual theories have been put forth for the rapid diversification of animal species in the early Cambrian period. The new study, published in Science, suggests a more holistic...

Evolution Big Bang Fits Darwin Theory
2013-09-12 15:31:02

[ Watch the Video: Big Bang Evolution Consistent With Darwin's Theory ] Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online While most people consider Charles Darwin the father of evolutionary theory, even the great English naturalist himself questioned aspects of his theory based on certain elements of the fossil record. A new study from a team of English and Australian researchers explores one major flaw in Darwin’s theory backed by fossil evidence – the so-called ‘big...

Fossils Show Anatomy Of Ancient Fuxianhuiid Arthropod
2013-02-28 09:06:34

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online An international group of scientists led by researchers at the University of Cambridge has made an extraordinary find in South China. For the first time, scientists are able to see through the head of the "fuxianhuiid" arthropod, revealing one of the earliest evolutionary examples of limbs used for feeding along with the oldest nervous system to stretch beyond the head in fossil record. Prior to this find, heads covered by a...

Evolution Of Complex Brains
2012-10-11 04:52:39

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Anatomically complex brains evolved earlier than previously thought and have changed little over the course of time, according to a new study by University of Arizona neurobiologist Nicholas Strausfeld. The specimen described in the study, which will be published in the October 11 issue of Nature, is the earliest known fossil to show a brain. The three inch long fossil was discovered embedded in mudstones deposited during the...

2012-03-08 10:52:29

Crabs, insects, and spiders in coastal salt marshes affected by the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill in April 2010 were both quite vulnerable to oil exposure, but also resilient enough to recover within a year if their host plants remained healthy, according to a study published Mar. 7 in the open access journal PLoS ONE. The researchers, graduate student Brittany McCall and her advisor Steven Pennings at the University of Houston, sampled communities of terrestrial arthropods and marine...


Latest Arthropod Reference Libraries

Allothereua maculate
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Image Caption: Scutigeromorph centipede, probably Allothereua maculata. Credit: Chris Bloke / Wikipedia (CC BY 2.0) Allothereua maculate is a species of house centipede that can be found in Australia. Its range extends from Queensland to Western Australia, an area where it is commonly found. It prefers a habitat within moist woodland areas or urban areas. It can reach an average body length of up to one inch. Its body is dark brown in body, with darker striped marking the fifteen...

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Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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