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Latest Arthropods Stories

266671cb96baf72ee44fbf602b718cc51
2010-12-23 14:07:50

Experiments by a team of researchers in New York and New Jersey have generated evidence that questions the common belief that the pterygotid eurypterids ("sea scorpions") were high-level predators in the Paleozoic oceans. This group, which ranged the seas from about 470 to 370 million years ago (long before the dinosaurs appeared), included the largest and, arguably, scariest-looking arthropods known to have evolved on planet Earth. Reaching lengths of 2 ½ meters with a...

2010-10-27 20:34:36

Cockroaches can skitter through a crowded under-the-sink cabinet, eluding capture or worse, making the insects a model for rescue robots that would creep through the debris of disaster in search of survivors. But learning how they use all six legs at the same time to walk, run and turn has been a difficult and time-consuming task. Until now. Using a pair of high-speed cameras and a custom computer program, researchers at Case Western Reserve University are able to simultaneously extract...

ee3ba894c56c520afdf35d7402e230341
2010-06-13 07:40:05

Insects may have tiny brains the size of a pinhead, but the latest research from the University of Adelaide shows just how clever they really are. For the first time, researchers from the University's Discipline of Physiology have worked out how insects judge the speed of moving objects. It appears that insect brain cells have additional mechanisms which can calculate how to make a controlled landing on a flower or reach a food source. This ability only works in a natural setting. In a paper...

a9f5371b9b19a199da7c8668816ffc541
2010-03-12 12:25:00

New evidence that specialized adaptations are not evolutionary dead ends Blind scorpions that live in the stygian depths of caves are throwing light on a long-held assumption that specialized adaptations are irreversible evolutionary dead-ends. According to a new phylogenetic analysis of the family Typhlochactidae, scorpions currently living closer to the surface (under stones and in leaf litter) evolved independently on more than one occasion from ancestors adapted to life further below the...

fdd68f451c0a1464c3ca4a5cd808349a1
2010-02-11 09:55:00

Any way you look at it -- by sheer weight, species diversity or population -- the hard-shelled, joint-legged creepy crawlies called arthropods dominate planet Earth. Because of their success and importance, scientists have been trying for decades to figure out the family relationships that link lobsters to millipedes and cockroaches to tarantulas and find which might have come first. In a scientific and technological tour de force that was nearly a decade in the making, a team of scientists...

2010-02-04 15:09:37

A study published today in Science, by researchers at Rothamsted Research (an institute of the BBSRC), the Met Office, the Natural Resources Institute, and the Universities of Exeter, Greenwich and York, sheds new light on the flight behaviors that enable insects to undertake long-distance migrations, and highlights the remarkable abilities of these insect migrants. Many insects avoid cold British winters by migrating south in autumn to over-wintering sites around the Mediterranean. Migrant...

2009-11-30 11:27:28

For the first time, scientists at The University of Western Ontario have shown that insects exposed to repeated periods of cold will trade reproduction for immediate survival. The study, conducted by Biology PhD candidate Katie Marshall and supervisor Brent Sinclair, has been published online Nov. 25 by the prestigious journal, Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Results showed flies exposed to multiple bouts of cold survived better, but produced fewer offspring.  Past research had...

6db188a0326a642dc2c09a5922c82a8c1
2009-10-28 08:03:07

University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) researchers are close to unraveling intricate cellular pathways that control molting in blue crabs. The discoveries could revolutionize the soft-shell crab industry, generating new jobs and additional profits for the U.S. fishing industry along the coastal Southeast. Soft-shelled blue crabs are a delicacy enjoyed by food lovers each spring and early summer when the crustaceans naturally molt their hard outer shell in the wild. Molting is the process...

2009-09-24 09:15:29

Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)-funded research, published this week in Chemical Communication, describes how scientists have discovered molecules that could confuse insects' ability to detect plants by interfering with their sense of smell. This could reduce damage to crops by insect pests and contribute to food security. Lead researcher Dr Antony Hooper of Rothamsted Research, an institute of BBSRC said: "One way in which insects find each other and their...

2009-08-24 14:10:40

They gracefully swim through the complete darkness of submarine caves, constantly on the lookout for prey. Instead of eyes, predatory crustaceans of the class Remipedia rely on long antennae which search the lightless void in all directions. Like some type of science fiction monster, their head is equipped with powerful prehensile limbs and poisonous fangs.Accordingly, the translations of their Latin names sound menacing. There is the "Secret Club Bearer" (Cryptocorynetes) or the "Beautiful...


Latest Arthropods Reference Libraries

Scutigera coleoptrata
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Image Caption: House Centipede, Scutigera coleoptrata. Credit: Bruce Marlin/Wikipedia  (CC BY 3.0) Scutigera coleoptrata is one of many species of house centipedes. This species is native to the Mediterranean, but it is capable of moving to other region of the world including most of Europe, South America, North America, and Asia. It is thought to have first ventured from its native range into Mexico and Guatemala, and its range has now stretched into Argentina in the south and Canada in...

40_9de0cb905b09e42423dfdf5cb4573214
2005-08-25 11:12:07

The Jerusalem cricket (Stenopelmatus) is a genus of large, flightless insects native to western United States, along the Pacific Coast, and south into Mexico. Because of its large, human-like head, it is commonly called the nino de la tierra (Spanish for "child of the earth"), or wó see ts'inii (Navajo for "skull insect"). It is also often called the potato bug, or alternatively the old bald-headed man. Despite their name, Jerusalem crickets are not true crickets. Also, Potato bugs are...

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