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Latest Arthropods Stories

2009-04-30 11:57:47

 Tiny mites living on the surface of Madagascar hissing cockroaches help decrease the  presence of a variety of molds on the cockroaches' bodies, potentially reducing allergic responses among humans who handle the popular insects, according to new research.Scientists cultured and identified fungi on the cockroaches' body surfaces with and without mites and discovered that the presence of these mites reduced the molds by at least 50 percent.Many of these same researchers reported a...

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2009-03-20 11:04:25

Hurdia victoria was originally described in 1912 as a crustacean-like animal. Now, researchers from Uppsala University and colleagues reveal it to be just one part of a complex and remarkable new animal that has an important story to tell about the origin of the largest group of living animals, the arthropods. The findings are being published in this week's issue of Science. The fossil fragments puzzled together come from the famous 505 million year old Burgess Shale, a UNESCO World Heritage...

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2009-02-06 07:54:05

A missing link in the evolution of the front claw of living scorpions and horseshoe crabs was identified with the discovery of a 390 million-year-old fossil by researchers at Yale and the University of Bonn, Germany. The specimen, named Schinderhannes bartelsi, was found fossilized in slate from a quarry near Bundenbach in Germany, a site that yields spectacularly durable pyrite-preserved fossils "” findings collectively known as the Hunsrck Slate. The Hunsrck Slate has previously...

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2009-01-12 13:38:37

Atlas of Scanning Electron Microscope Images of the Book Lung Published by the American Museum of Natural History Modern microscopy technology has allowed two scorpion biologists, Carsten Kamenz of the Humboldt University in Berlin and Lorenzo Prendini of the American Museum of Natural History, to study and document what is nearly invisible. Looking at tiny morphological features like the sculpting of the hair-like outgrowths on lamellae"”structures that fold like the leaves of a book...

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2008-10-14 12:25:10

300 million-year-old discovery in an unlikely setting -- a suburban strip mall While paleontologists may scour remote, exotic places in search of prehistoric specimens, Tufts researchers have found what they believe to be the world's oldest whole-body fossil impression of a flying insect in a wooded field behind a strip mall in North Attleboro, Mass. During a recent exploration as part of his senior project, Richard J. Knecht, a Tufts geology major, and Jake Benner, a paleontologist and...

2008-09-27 03:00:20

THIRD place goes to Miranda Aston and Ulrike Ull, of Woodland Avenue, Earlsdon, Coventry. They win a compost crock apple from Lakeland and a copy of Organic Gardening by Geoff Hamilton. MIRANDA, a chartered engineer and Ulrike, a photography lecturer, bought the house 16 years ago, mainly because they loved the garden. With a lawn surrounded by deep shrubs and established trees, they wanted to keep it as it was and maintain it in a way that continued to attract birds, wildlife and...

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2008-09-01 10:55:00

A new study by researchers at the University of Basel's Zoological Institute illustrates the complex nature of the relationship between parent and offspring, even among insects. The study found that larvae and nymphs actively solicit their parents for food, protection and affection, doing everything from kicking their mother in the face to hitting her with their antennae to get what they want. The research may hold clues about how such manipulation first evolved in certain species, including...

2008-08-01 16:49:59

Some insects live much of their lives under water, using air bubbles gathered at the surface to survive. Now scientists have discovered just how deep they can go. Based on a new model of how the air bubbles work, the deepest-diving bugs could as far down as 98 feet (30 meters), researchers said this week. The scientists figured out how the air bubbles work, and why they wouldn't pop at such depths. However, most bugs never go deeper than a few yards (meters), they said. "Some...

2008-07-17 12:00:25

By Wendy Leonard Deseret News After digging around in central Utah's desert, high school students enrolled in Westminster's Paleo Camp cleaned and studied the various fossil rocks they had found. "If you want to study the history of life on Earth, this is the place to do it," said Dave Goldsmith, a geology faculty member at Westminster. He chaperoned the group of ninth- to 12th-graders to a fossil quarry at Antelope Springs in Sevier County last Tuesday, then taught them about their...

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2008-05-20 08:57:22

First identified in 1899, y-larvae have been one of the greatest zoological mysteries for over a century. No one has ever found an adult of these puzzling crustaceans, despite the plethora of these larvae in plankton, leading generations of marine zoologists to wonder just what y-larvae grow up to be. A study published in BioMed Central's open access journal, BMC Biology, reports the transformation of the larvae into a previously unseen, wholly un-crustacean-like, parasitic form.Y larvae, or...


Latest Arthropods Reference Libraries

Scutigera coleoptrata
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Image Caption: House Centipede, Scutigera coleoptrata. Credit: Bruce Marlin/Wikipedia  (CC BY 3.0) Scutigera coleoptrata is one of many species of house centipedes. This species is native to the Mediterranean, but it is capable of moving to other region of the world including most of Europe, South America, North America, and Asia. It is thought to have first ventured from its native range into Mexico and Guatemala, and its range has now stretched into Argentina in the south and Canada in...

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2005-08-25 11:12:07

The Jerusalem cricket (Stenopelmatus) is a genus of large, flightless insects native to western United States, along the Pacific Coast, and south into Mexico. Because of its large, human-like head, it is commonly called the nino de la tierra (Spanish for "child of the earth"), or wó see ts'inii (Navajo for "skull insect"). It is also often called the potato bug, or alternatively the old bald-headed man. Despite their name, Jerusalem crickets are not true crickets. Also, Potato bugs are...

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Word of the Day
cacodemon
  • An evil spirit; a devil.
  • A nightmare.
  • In astrology, the twelfth house of a scheme or figure of the heavens: so called from its signifying dreadful things, such as secret enemies, great losses, imprisonment, etc.
'Cacodemon' comes from a Greek term meaning 'evil genius.'
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