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Latest Asexual reproduction Stories

2014-05-21 11:03:07

University of Iowa It's how life survives in a constantly changing environment In Lewis Carroll’s 1871 classic novel Through the Looking Glass, the Red Queen tells Alice: “Now, here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place.” Over the years, evolutionary biologists have used the Red Queen’s statement to refer to the “Red Queen” hypothesis, which describes how living organisms, including humans, manage to survive in a changing environment by...

Sexual Reproduction Second Choice For Powdery Mildew
2013-07-15 12:33:46

University of Zurich Powdery mildew is one of the most dreaded plant diseases: The parasitic fungus afflicts crops such as wheat and barley and is responsible for large harvest shortfalls every year. Beat Keller and Thomas Wicker, both plant biologists from the University of Zurich, and their team have been analyzing the genetic material of wheat mildew varieties from Switzerland, England and Israel while the team headed by Paul Schulze-Lefert at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding...

2012-11-16 14:08:02

Believed to 'ingest' DNA from other simple organisms Up to ten per cent of the active genes of an organism that has survived 80 million years without sex are foreign, a new study from the University of Cambridge and Imperial College London reveals. The asexual organism, the bdelloid rotifer, has acquired a tenth of its active genes from bacteria and other simple organisms like fungi and algae. The findings were reported today in the journal PLoS Genetics. Bdelloid rotifers are best...

2011-11-17 08:00:00

The Biology Magazine publishes reviews on popular topics in the biological sciences. The latest inclusions cover the biological principles of genetics and include a review on Inheritance and one on Sexual Reproduction. Mannheim, Germany (PRWEB) November 17, 2011 The Science Magazine EurekaMag.com covers a wide range of topics including biology, agriculture, horticulture, forestry, geography, environment and health. Drawing from this pool of scientific disciplines, it publishes reviews on...

2011-07-08 02:07:08

Biology textbooks maintain that the main function of sex is to promote genetic diversity. But Henry Heng, Ph.D., associate professor in WSU's Center for Molecular Medicine and Genetics, says that's not the case. Heng and fellow researcher Root Gorelick, Ph.D., associate professor at Carleton University in Canada, propose that although diversity may result from a combination of genes, the primary function of sex is not about promoting diversity. Rather, it's about keeping the genome context...

2011-04-19 12:51:24

Animals that reproduce asexually by somatic cloning have special mechanisms that delay ageing provide exceptionally good health. Scientists at the University of Gothenburg have shown how colony-forming ascidians (or sea squirts) can activate the enzyme telomerase, which protects DNA. This enzyme is more active also in humans who attain an advanced age. "Animals that clone themselves, in which part of an individual's body is passes on to the next generations, have particularly interesting...

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2010-11-03 12:45:00

By Mick Kulikowski, North Carolina State University In a finding that upends decades of scientific theory on reptile reproduction, researchers at North Carolina State University have discovered that female boa constrictors can squeeze out babies without mating. More strikingly, the finding shows that the babies produced from this asexual reproduction have attributes previously believed to be impossible. Large litters of all-female babies produced by the "super mom" boa constrictor show...

2010-10-14 15:08:22

University of Toronto biologists identify influence of environment on sexual vs. asexual reproduction Evolutionary biologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) have found that environment plays a key role in determining whether a species opts for sexual over asexual reproduction. The study, led by post-doctoral student Lutz Becks and Professor Aneil Agrawal of the Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, found that species that inhabit spatially heterogenous environments "“...

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2010-10-13 11:11:56

A study of peptide hormones in the brain of a seemingly primitive flatworm reveals the surprising complexity of its nervous system and opens up a new approach for combating a major parasitic disease, researchers report. The study appears in the open-access journal PLoS Biology. The planarian flatworm, Schmidtea mediterranea, is perhaps best known for its prodigious powers of regeneration. Cut it in half (lengthwise or crosswise) and each fragment will regrow its missing parts, including its...

2010-03-08 09:25:57

Argonaute 9 inhibits asexual reproduction, apparently by silencing transposons One seemingly insurmountable obstacle to the dream of virtually limitless yields of staple crops like corn, wheat and rice is the dependence of those plants on sexual reproduction. When male and female gametes -- sperm and egg -- combine randomly to generate a genetically unique seed, valuable parental traits painstakingly selected by breeders are erased. But what if plants like these could be engineered to...


Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.