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Latest Asian long-horned beetle Stories

2012-03-15 12:39:28

Tennessee's urban forests, currently valued at about $80 billion, also provide almost  $650 million in benefits such as carbon storage, pollution removal, and energy reduction according to a new U.S. Forest Service report. The authors of Urban Forests of Tennessee, 2009 found there are 284 million trees in urban areas in the state, with canopies covering 33.7 percent of 1.6 million acres of urban area. Those urban forests provide an estimated $204 million per year in pollution removal...

2011-09-12 11:22:04

Non-native, wood-boring insects such as the emerald ash borer and the Asian longhorned beetle are costing an estimated $1.7 billion in local government expenditures and approximately $830 million in lost residential property values every year, according to study by a research team that included scientists with the U.S. Forest Service, Northern Research Station. The research effort was funded by The Nature Conservancy and supported by the University of California / Santa Barbara's National...

Invasive Insects Cost Billions
2011-09-11 04:15:13

  Homeowners and taxpayers are picking up most of the tab for damages caused by invasive tree-feeding insects that are inadvertently imported along with packing materials, live plants, and other goods. That's the conclusion of a team of biologists and economists, whose research findings are reported in the journal PLoS One last week. The authors explain that non-native, wood-boring insects such as the emerald ash borer and the Asian longhorned beetle exact an estimated $1.7...

Are New Englands Iconic Maples At Risk
2011-08-30 07:59:19

  Invasive Asian longhorned beetle has potential for wide reach in region's forests Are new England's iconic maple trees at risk? If a beetle has its way, the answer may be yes. Results from the first study of the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) in forests show that the invasive insect can easily spread from tree-lined city streets to neighboring forests. A paper reporting the results are published in the Canadian Journal of Forest Research. Successful ALB eradication...

2011-08-16 11:00:00

Wood-Boring Pest Now in Neighboring States, Could Threaten Hardwoods Industry ROCK SPRINGS, Pa., Aug. 16, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Agriculture Secretary George Greig today asked the public to help keep the Asian Longhorned Beetle from entering the state, saying the non-native, invasive wood-boring pest could severely harm Pennsylvania's $25 billion hardwoods industry. "The Asian Longhorned Beetle has not yet been found in Pennsylvania, but if it is allowed to enter it could pose a...

2011-04-28 12:05:00

The general public is on the front lines of detection of tree-killing insects and diseases ARLINGTON, Va., April 28, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Now that spring has arrived, and summer is quickly approaching, The Nature Conservancy, along with nursery industry partners and scientists, encourages people to take the time to learn more about tree-killing invasive insects and diseases as they spend more time outdoors. Everyday citizens can help detect forest pests and prevent their spread...


Latest Asian long-horned beetle Reference Libraries

40_aa7129192d69d157eeabb7bc55896155
2005-09-12 09:52:32

The Asian long-horned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis) is native to China and Korea where it causes widespread destruction of poplar, willow, elm, and maple throughout vast areas of eastern Asia. Asian longhorned beetles are big, showy insects: shiny and coal black with white spots. Adults are about 1 inch (2.5 cm) long. On their head is a pair of very long antennae that are alternately ringed in black and white. The antennae are longer than the insect's body. An invasive species in...

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Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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