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Latest Asian long-horned beetle Stories

Invasive Insects Cost Billions
2011-09-11 04:15:13

  Homeowners and taxpayers are picking up most of the tab for damages caused by invasive tree-feeding insects that are inadvertently imported along with packing materials, live plants, and other goods. That's the conclusion of a team of biologists and economists, whose research findings are reported in the journal PLoS One last week. The authors explain that non-native, wood-boring insects such as the emerald ash borer and the Asian longhorned beetle exact an estimated $1.7...

Are New Englands Iconic Maples At Risk
2011-08-30 07:59:19

  Invasive Asian longhorned beetle has potential for wide reach in region's forests Are new England's iconic maple trees at risk? If a beetle has its way, the answer may be yes. Results from the first study of the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) in forests show that the invasive insect can easily spread from tree-lined city streets to neighboring forests. A paper reporting the results are published in the Canadian Journal of Forest Research. Successful ALB eradication...

2011-08-16 11:00:00

Wood-Boring Pest Now in Neighboring States, Could Threaten Hardwoods Industry ROCK SPRINGS, Pa., Aug. 16, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Agriculture Secretary George Greig today asked the public to help keep the Asian Longhorned Beetle from entering the state, saying the non-native, invasive wood-boring pest could severely harm Pennsylvania's $25 billion hardwoods industry. "The Asian Longhorned Beetle has not yet been found in Pennsylvania, but if it is allowed to enter it could pose a...

2011-04-28 12:05:00

The general public is on the front lines of detection of tree-killing insects and diseases ARLINGTON, Va., April 28, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Now that spring has arrived, and summer is quickly approaching, The Nature Conservancy, along with nursery industry partners and scientists, encourages people to take the time to learn more about tree-killing invasive insects and diseases as they spend more time outdoors. Everyday citizens can help detect forest pests and prevent their spread...

2011-02-18 11:14:00

Non-native insects and diseases can spread by traveling on wood packaging and other untreated wood ARLINGTON, Va., Feb. 18, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A collaboration of diverse interests aimed at addressing the threat of non-native insects and diseases is urging the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) to subject wood packaging material from Canada to the same requirements other countries must follow for this material before it can enter the country. Currently, the...

2010-12-15 13:44:00

Thirty-five percent of firewood is brought from another location, increasing risk of invasion from forest pests ARLINGTON, Va., Dec. 15, 2010 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- As winter arrives, people across the country are engaging in a centuries-old tradition of buying or gathering firewood to fuel home fires. In a recent poll conducted by The Nature Conservancy, one in twenty Americans said they moved firewood long distances (i.e., more than 50 miles, a distance widely accepted as moving it...

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2010-12-06 10:26:56

By Zenaida Gonzalez Kotala, University of Central Florida Foreign pests are eating their way through our national forests, destroying majestic scenery and costing taxpayers millions of dollars. If enforcement efforts to prevent their importation aren't stepped up, irreplaceable resources will be lost forever and taxpayers can expect to fork over billions of dollars more by 2019, according to a comprehensive study published today in BioScience. Researchers at the University of California at...

2010-09-21 09:00:00

Early detection is critical to stopping the spread of these pests for which native plants have no evolved resistance ARLINGTON, Va., Sept. 21 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Recent discoveries of the spread of the Asian longhorned beetle, Thousand Cankers Disease, emerald ash borer, light brown apple moth, sweet orange scab, and citrus greening disease should put all gardeners and homeowners on alert this fall for these and other invasive pests. If undetected, they can wreak havoc on yards...

2010-08-12 08:00:00

ARLINGTON, Va., Aug. 12 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A different sort of "Beetlemania" - the invasion of the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) - has begun in the Northeast, and the potential threat to region's trees and forests is enormous. In an effort to warn residents to keep an eye out for these tree-killing pests, WGBH, a member station of the Public Broadcasting Service, located in Boston, MA, is airing Lurking in the Trees, on Sunday, August 15, 2010 at 1 p.m., EDT. The film tells the...

2010-08-09 10:00:00

HARRISBURG, Pa., Aug. 9 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Pennsylvania's ongoing efforts to control destructive forest pests and invasive vegetation in state forests and parks received an infusion of needed funds - and a strong vote of confidence -- through the recent approval of more than $350,000 in federal grants, the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources announced today. Five USDA Forest Service grants totaling $353,500 are earmarked for DCNR's bureaus of forestry and state parks...


Latest Asian long-horned beetle Reference Libraries

40_aa7129192d69d157eeabb7bc55896155
2005-09-12 09:52:32

The Asian long-horned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis) is native to China and Korea where it causes widespread destruction of poplar, willow, elm, and maple throughout vast areas of eastern Asia. Asian longhorned beetles are big, showy insects: shiny and coal black with white spots. Adults are about 1 inch (2.5 cm) long. On their head is a pair of very long antennae that are alternately ringed in black and white. The antennae are longer than the insect's body. An invasive species in...

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Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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