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Latest associate professor Stories

2013-11-07 13:56:23

The growing threat to our National Parks from horse dung Research team leader, Associate Professor Catherine Pickering, said the Griffith study looked at the number and types of weed seeds which can be dispersed through horse manure. The findings have been published in the journal Ecological Management and Restoration. "We reviewed 15 studies on seed germination from horse dung; six from Europe, four from North America, three from Australia and one study each from Africa and Central...

2013-08-19 14:08:13

In a discovery that could have major implications for the aerospace, automotive and electronics industries, scientists have found a way to dramatically reduce the corrosion rate of lightweight wonder metal magnesium: adding arsenic. Weighing in at two thirds less than aluminum, magnesium is the lightest structural metal. It has many potential industrial applications, but uptake is severely restricted by its poor resistance to corrosion. Identification of methods to restrict magnesium...

2013-08-12 11:24:39

An Indiana University study found that the percentage of votes for Republican and Democratic candidates in 2010 and 2012 races for the U.S. House of Representatives could be predicted by the percentage of tweets that mentioned those candidates — and it didn't matter whether the tweets were positive or negative. "Think of this as a measurement of buzz," said Fabio Rojas, an associate professor of sociology in the College of Arts and Sciences at IU Bloomington. "We call this the 'all...

2013-08-06 04:20:03

Singapore, Aug 6, 2013 - (ACN Newswire) - A team of scientists led by Associate Professor Zeng Qi(1) from A*STAR's Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB) have discovered a new biomarker which will help physicians predict how well cancer patients respond to cancer drugs. Having the means to identify patients who are most likely to benefit from currently available cancer drugs not only reduces substantially the healthcare cost for the patient, it could mean saving precious lives by...

2013-07-26 18:47:57

A new study of 100 private water wells in and near the Barnett Shale showed elevated levels of potential contaminants such as arsenic and selenium closest to natural gas extraction sites, according to a team of researchers that was led by UT Arlington associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry Kevin Schug. The results of the North Texas well study were published online by the journal Environmental Science & Technology Thursday. The peer-reviewed paper focuses on the presence of...

2013-07-09 21:16:49

University of Adelaide researchers have developed a new nanomaterial that could help reduce carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired power stations. The new nanomaterial, described in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, efficiently separates the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide from nitrogen, the other significant component of the waste gas released by coal-fired power stations. This would allow the carbon dioxide to be separated before being stored, rather than released to the...

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2013-04-10 09:58:30

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Bucknell University Associate Professor of Biology DeeAnn Reeder made a surprising discovery recently while conducting research in South Sudan. Collaborating with Fauna & Flora International (FFI) Programme Officer Adrian Garside, her discovery led to the identification of a completely new genus of bat found while on a mission to conduct general field research and pursue conservation efforts in this remote region of Africa....

2013-03-13 15:03:33

The widespread introduction of a chicken pox vaccine in Australia in 2006 has prevented thousands of children from being hospitalized with severe chicken pox and saved lives, according to new research. In a national study of chicken pox admissions at four participating Australian children's hospitals, researchers found the number of children hospitalized with chicken pox or shingles had dropped by 68% since 2006. The research was led by Associate Professor Helen Marshall from the...

Humans Train Their Brain To Like Certain Music, Rather Than Rely On Nature To Do It For Them
2013-02-14 14:50:03

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online A new study has shown that those who dislike a certain style of music based on the sound of it, or the use of harmonies within, simply aren´t trying hard enough. In other words, our love of music and appreciation for harmony is a product of nurture, not nature. According to associate professor Neil McLachlan from the Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, people can learn to appreciate and even love different styles...


Word of the Day
kenspeckle
  • Having so marked an appearance as easily to be recognized.
This word may come from the Swedish 'kanspak,' quick at recognizing persons or things, or else from confusion with 'conspicuous.'