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Latest associate professor Stories

2012-03-12 14:38:27

A study of cervical cancer incidence and mortality in North Carolina has revealed areas where rates are unusually high. The findings indicate that education, screening, and vaccination programs in those places could be particularly useful, according to public health researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, who authored the report. “In general the rates of incidence and mortality in North Carolina are consistent with national averages,” said Jennifer S....

2012-03-09 00:53:28

By discovering how a blood clot-busting enzyme is switched on, researchers have unlocked a century-old atomic riddle that could lead to new treatments for clotting and bleeding disorders, and some cancers. Monash University researchers, led by Professor James Whisstock and Associate Professor Paul Coughlin, together with colleagues at the Australian Synchrotron have shown how the protein plasminogen is converted into plasmin, an enzyme that removes disease-causing clots and clears up...

2012-03-02 14:02:45

Researchers at the University of California, Davis, have figured out how the human body keeps essential genes switched “on” and silences the vast stretches of genetic repeats and “junk” DNA. Frédéric Chédin, associate professor in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, describes the research in a paper published today (March 1) in the journal Molecular Cell. The work could lead to treatments for lupus and other...

2012-02-22 21:34:08

Sometimes our immune defence attacks our own cells. When this happens in the brain we see neurodegenerative diseases such as dementia, Alzheimer´s and Parkinson´s disease. But if the the immune defence is inhibited, the results could be disastrous. Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have now discovered one of the molecular combat mechanisms in the brain that gets out of control in these diseases. In time this may enable targeted therapies to slow down the disease without...

2012-02-03 19:00:34

Refugee children have scant access to medical care and are particularly vulnerable to disease. Fresh research results from the University of Copenhagen show that just a few hours of schooling a week may have a pronounced positive impact on their health not only in childhood but later in life when they achieve adulthood. "There is an unambiguous link between health and schooling among refugee groups as they flee," says external Associate Professor Tania Dræbel, PhD from the...

2012-01-26 17:15:00

DALLAS, Jan. 26, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have developed what they believe to be the first clinical application of a new imaging technique to diagnose brain tumors. The unique test could preclude the need for surgery in patients whose tumors are located in areas of the brain too dangerous to biopsy. This new magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) technique provides a definitive diagnosis of cancer based on imaging of a protein...

2011-12-05 13:01:24

Damage to podocytes -- a specialized type of epithelial cell in the kidney -- occurs in more than 90 percent of all chronic kidney disease. Now researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have uncovered an unexpected pathway that reveals for the first time how these cells may regenerate and renew themselves during normal kidney function. This finding is an important step toward one day therapeutically coaxing the cells to divide, which could be used to treat people with...

Defining A Cyberbully
2011-11-09 05:00:09

Social scientists struggle to characterize new form of harassment The following is part one of a three part National Science Foundation series: Bullying in the Age of Social Media. "I was cyberbullied at age 40 by someone that tried to beat me up in high school," says a person posting on a website that chronicles stories of people intimidated through digital communications. But I ended up winning the fight, he says. "They held that grudge for 28 years before Googling me, figuring out...

Image 1 - Worms Among First Animals To Appear After Asteroid Impact
2011-10-11 12:21:28

University of Colorado researchers have found that worms were among the first animals to surface after an asteroid plowed into the Gulf of Mexico 65.5 million years ago. Geological sciences Associate Professor Karen Chin of the university said this "K-T extinction" is often focused on the survival and proliferation of mammals, and studies show some of the earliest terrestrial ecosystems to emerge were aquatic plants. However, new evidence from North Dakota shows networks of...

2011-09-26 15:06:21

“Uncle Tom´s Cabin,” the best-selling novel of the 19th century, has had an enduring impact on film and popular culture. In a year when we observe the 200th anniversary of author Harriet Beecher Stowe´s birth, a UC researcher is presenting on the novel´s impact, interpretation and reinterpretation on the silver screen. “Uncle Tom´s Cabin” by Harriet Beecher Stowe was the best-selling novel of the 19th century, and almost immediately upon its...