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Latest associate professor Stories

2011-09-16 11:30:30

USC researchers target gene common among African-American men A study led by University of Southern California (USC) epidemiologists suggests that a high intake of calcium causes prostate cancer among African-American men who are genetically good absorbers of the mineral. "High dietary intake of calcium has long been linked to prostate cancer and this study suggests that these associations are likely to be causal," said Sue Ann Ingles, Dr.P.H., associate professor of preventive medicine...

2011-09-15 04:34:00

UPPSALA, Sweden, September 15, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Swedish life science initiative Uppsala BIO has formed a strategic partnering agreement with Roche, the world leading pharmaceuticals and diagnostics company, for Uppsala BIO's open innovation program, BIO-X. The cooperation agreement links Uppsala BIO and BIO-X to Roche's global innovation network on at least a three-year term, and will offer projects selected in the BIO-X program access to Roche's expertise in early...

2011-09-07 14:05:14

Parental safety concerns may prevent children from getting good exercise, according to a new North Carolina State University study that examined how families use neighborhood parks. Results from the study suggest that children who were monitored too closely by hovering “helicopter” parents were less likely to engage in higher levels of physical activity. “It´s a catch-22 for today´s parents, unfortunately. Many parents are worried about the safety of their...

2011-08-31 23:17:18

Memo to mature, health-minded vampires: You might want to consider limiting your treats to victims under age 30. In a study to be published Sept. 1 in Nature, Stanford University School of Medicine scientists have found substances in the blood of old mice that makes young brains act older. These substances, whose levels rise with increasing age, appear to inhibit the brain's ability to produce new nerve cells critical to memory and learning. The findings raise the question of whether it...

2011-08-26 15:31:54

Researchers at the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, have examined a number of plants which are used for illegal abortions in Tanzania. The lab tests show that several of the plants can make the uterus tissue contract and that the plants therefore can be used to stop lethal bleedings after birth. This new knowledge is now to be conveyed in rural Tanzania where access to medicine often is difficult. Every year around 350,000 women die globally due to post partum...

2011-08-10 10:01:00

COLLEGE PARK, Md., Aug. 10, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Maryland Industrial Partnerships Program (MIPS), a historically effective innovation development program in the State of Maryland, has approved 15 new high-technology and biotechnology product development grants worth $4.2 million. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20101005/MTECHLOGO ) Among the projects are new drugs, treatments or tests for breast cancer, staph infections and malaria, "green" heated chicken house...

2011-08-01 16:10:23

The push for campaign finance reform may be driven by a tendency to overestimate the power of political messages to influence other people's opinions, according to researchers. In an experiment, people who viewed negative political advertising said the advertisements had little effect on their own opinions, but believed the ads would have a greater influence on others, said Fuyuan Shen, associate professor, communications, Penn State. "People have a tendency to overestimate the effect media...

2011-07-21 12:25:31

The optgenetical engineering technology controls the activity of orexin neurons of the brain Recently, optogenetics, which controls the activity of neuron using the light-activated protein, has been getting a lot of attention. This light-activated protein works like a switch of neurons by sensing specific color of light. This time, Associate Professor Akihiro YAMANAKA and Dr. Tomomi Tsunematsu from National Institute for Physiological Sciences (NIPS), succeeded in suppressing only the...

2011-06-28 20:30:06

Tiny metallic particles produced by University of Adelaide chemistry researchers are bringing new hope for the production of cheap, efficient and clean hydrogen energy. Led by Associate Professor Greg Metha, Head of Chemistry, the researchers are exploring how the metal nanoparticles act as highly efficient catalysts in using solar radiation to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. "Efficient and direct production of hydrogen from solar radiation provides a renewable energy source that is the...

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2011-06-28 07:37:23

Babies born prematurely could be at greater risk of developing kidney diseases later in life according to a landmark study investigating the impacts of preterm birth on kidney development. The Monash University study is identifying new strategies for minimising the consequences of being born preterm, which accounts for around eight percent of births each year in Australia. By comparing the kidneys of babies born prematurely with those born after the full nine-month gestation, the research...