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Latest Association of American Physicians and Surgeons Stories

2014-09-15 12:25:16

TUCSON, Ariz., Sept. 15, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Lack of health coverage is said to kill, but there is surprisingly little evidence to support this claim, writes Linda Gorman in the fall issue of the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons. The 2002 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report Care without Coverage: Too Little, Too Late asserted that 18,000 Americans died each year because they lacked health coverage. The report did not discuss whether mortality rate differences...

2014-09-15 12:24:47

TUCSON, Ariz., Sept. 15, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The rapid increase in medical costs starting in the 1970s is commonly ascribed be market imperfections. However, federal and state governments have long suppressed the functioning of the market system in the medical industry, write Maureen Buff and Timothy Terrell in the fall issue of the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons. "Third-party payment, with its moral hazard, has increased demand and thereby driven up...

2014-09-15 12:24:45

TUCSON, Ariz., Sept. 15, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- According to an investigation by the Government Accountability Office (GAO), the enrollment system for the Affordable Care Act (ACA or "ObamaCare"), gets a score of 92 percent for incompetence, writes New York neurologist Lawrence R. Huntoon, M.D., Ph.D., in the fall issue of the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons. The GAO found that 92 percent (11/12) of fictitious enrollees were approved and given subsidized...

2014-09-15 12:24:42

TUCSON, Ariz., Sept. 15, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- "Best practices" in medicine are based on clinical trials, which are supposedly at the highest level of evidence. But instead of bringing sound science into drug testing, clinical trials have brought a neglect of patients' individual needs and an epidemic of over-prescribing, writes Henry Bauer, Ph.D., in the fall issue of the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons. The benefits of vaccination or antibiotics are readily...

2014-09-15 12:22:28

TUCSON, Ariz., Sept. 15, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Obama Administration's attack on coal-fired electricity, through draconian "carbon" rules imposed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), makes bogus claims about lives to be saved, states the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons (AAPS). The Administration is lumping together carbon dioxide--the basic building block of all living things and also a weak greenhouse gas--and soot. So is the American Lung...

2014-07-07 12:28:37

TUCSON, Ariz., July 7, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The recent surge in illegal border crossings, especially by unaccompanied children, could cause a serious public health crisis in the U.S., according to the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons. There is a high risk of bringing deadly diseases, both familiar like measles and unfamiliar like dengue ("bonebreak") fever, to a vulnerable population. The proper public health response is to confine the risk and alert...

2014-06-12 12:29:47

TUCSON, Ariz., June 12, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Public policy is often based on studies that are statistically flawed at the start, or are misrepresented in the press. William M. Briggs, Ph.D., explains six common fallacies in layman's terms in the summer issue of the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons. For example, the radon scare illustrates the "Everyone Else Said It Was True" Fallacy. A Danish study that showed no association between indoor radon levels and lung...

2014-06-12 12:29:32

TUCSON, Ariz., June 12, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- If Congress balks at enacting a costly and oppressive law, political activists often get around it by filing a lawsuit against an administrative agency, very often the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The agency isn't really an opponent in the lawsuit. Rather, it welcomes it as an opportunity to expand its power. Through a collusive consent decree, costly rules can be imposed on an industry without even the bother of a...

2014-06-12 12:28:22

TUCSON, Ariz., June 12, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- "Statins," already the most prescribed drugs in history, are being recommended for more and more patients as "primary prevention" for cardiovascular disease. Nearly 900 studies have been published on the adverse effects of these medications, and a look at their mechanism of action suggests ample reason for caution. Neurospecialist and pharmacologist Timothy M. Marshall, Ph.D., discusses the controversy in the summer issue of the...

2014-06-12 12:27:15

TUCSON, Ariz., June 12, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Despite tons of research and constant anti-obesity campaigns, obesity is increasing, and its cause is not understood, writes neuroendocrinologist Hermann Borg, M.D., in the summer issue of the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons. It's more than the simplistic balance of energy input and output, Dr. Borg explains. More complex concepts such as the "adipostat" and "slow metabolism," however, have not been helpful....


Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
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