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Latest Astronomical transit Stories

698cdd1e78a274e87cf89692f0f12cb51
2006-08-31 12:51:56

This image is a never-before-seen astronomical alignment of a moon traversing the face of Uranus, and its accompanying shadow. The white dot near the center of Uranus' blue-green disk is the icy moon Ariel. The 700-mile-diameter satellite is casting a shadow onto the cloud tops of Uranus. To an observer on Uranus, this would appear as a solar eclipse, where the moon briefly blocks out the Sun as its shadow races across Uranus's cloud tops. Though such "transits" by moons across the disks of...

5a496981447e34a53fffbc5e0959de6a1
2006-02-11 12:45:47

Sunspot, NM -- The planet Venus is best known for the thick layers of clouds that veil its surface from view by telescopes on Earth. But the veil has holes, and a New Mexico State University scientist plans on using a solar telescope to peer through them to study the weather on Venus. "Observations of Venus from a nighttime telescope at a single location are very difficult because Venus is so close to the Sun in the sky," said Dr. Nancy Chanover, a planetary scientist at NMSU in Las Cruces,...

dd5a4bf09d87fb64e1d959f3f3730a2c1
2005-01-13 07:43:23

On Thursday, January 13th, Saturn will be 750 million miles from Earth--the closest we get to the ringed planet this year. Science@NASA -- When the sun sets on Thursday, January 13th, a golden star will rise in the east. Soaring overhead at midnight, it will be up all night long, beautiful and eye-catching. That "star" is Saturn. January 13th is a special date for Saturn because that's when it is closest to Earth: only 750 million miles away, compared to a maximum distance of almost a...

e4f50fc44f1b27e9cd9281c66a76e3831
2004-12-31 08:22:09

Counting down the top ten astrobiology stories for 2004 highlights the accomplishments of those exploring Mars, Saturn, comets, and planets beyond Pluto. Number nine in this countdown was the rarest of all eclipses, the once-per-century eclipse of the Sun by Venus. Astrobiology Magazine -- The Venus transit was a global event. The eclipse was visible from approximately 75 percent of the Earth. Only the two inner planets, Mercury and Venus, can show this phenomenon, but the last time a transit...

2004-11-25 03:00:11

It may seem strange now, but in June, the sun didn't set until 8:45 p.m. It's six months later, and the sun sinks below the horizon shortly after 5 p.m. Our number of daylight hours clearly has shrunk. On the first day of summer, it reached its annual maximum for Roanoke at 14 hours 44 minutes. In just three weeks from now on Dec. 21, it will have dropped to only 9 hours 35 minutes, our annual minimum. The noonday sun is much lower in the sky than it was several months ago and casts long...


Latest Astronomical transit Reference Libraries

7_9ed77167bb9b6f0379e955473d8eead32
2004-10-19 04:45:43

Positional Astronomy -- Positional astronomy is the study of the positions of celestial objects. This is the oldest branch of astronomy and dates back to antiquity. Observations of celestial objects are important for religious and astrological purposes, as well as for timekeeping. Ancient structures associated with positional astronomy include: -- Chichn Itz -- The Medicine Wheel -- The Pyramids -- Stonehenge -- The Temple of the Sun The unaided human eye can...

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Word of the Day
bodacious
  • Remarkable; prodigious.
  • Audacious; gutsy.
  • Completely; extremely.
  • Audaciously; boldly.
  • Impressively great in size; enormous; extraordinary.
This word is probably from the dialectal 'boldacious,' a blend of 'bold' and 'audacious.'
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