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Latest Astronomy Stories

interstellar medium solves pulsar mystery
2014-05-07 04:48:07

[ Watch the Video: Radio Wave Emission From A Pulsar ] John P. Millis, Ph.D. for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online When a massive star, typically around 10 times the mass of our Sun, reaches the end of its main-sequence life, a series of events begins that eventually leads to a brilliant supernova. The shockwave from the event ejects most of the material into the surrounding interstellar medium, leaving a brilliant blanket of glowing gas that hangs in the sky for thousands of years....

Magnetic Fingerprint Of Our Galaxy Revealed By Planck
2014-05-06 03:21:32

ESA Our Galaxy's magnetic field is revealed in a new image from ESA's Planck satellite. This image was compiled from the first all-sky observations of 'polarized' light emitted by interstellar dust in the Milky Way. Light is a very familiar form of energy and yet some of its properties are all but hidden to everyday human experience. One of these – polarization – carries a wealth of information about what happened along a light ray's path, and can be exploited by astronomers....

Upcoming Camelopardalid Meteor Shower Could Rival The Perseids
2014-05-21 08:00:12

[ Watch the Video: ScienceCasts - NASA On The Lookout For A New Meteor Shower ] Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online May isn’t exactly known for its meteor showers. In fact, this month’s Camelopardalid meteor shower, caused by dust from periodic comet 209P/LINEAR, has technically never even been seen before. However, astronomers have predicted that May 2014 could see a Camelopardalid meteor shower that rivals the year’s biggest display – the Perseids of August....

Intense Solar Storm Narrowly Misses Earth
2014-05-02 15:33:50

[ Watch The Video: ScienceCasts: Carrington-Class CME Narrowly Misses Earth ] Science@NASA Last month (April 8-11), scientists, government officials, emergency planners and others converged on Boulder, Colorado, for NOAA's Space Weather Workshop—an annual gathering to discuss the perils and probabilities of solar storms. The current solar cycle is weaker than usual, so you might expect a correspondingly low-key meeting. On the contrary, the halls and meeting rooms were abuzz...

Uranus
2014-05-02 04:00:57

NASA/JPL NASA's Cassini spacecraft has captured its first-ever image of the pale blue ice-giant planet Uranus in the distance beyond Saturn's rings. The robotic spacecraft briefly turned its gaze away from the ringed beauty of Saturn on April 11, 2014, to observe the distant planet, which is the seventh planet from the sun. The planets Uranus and Neptune are sometimes referred to as "ice giants" to distinguish them from their larger siblings, Jupiter and Saturn, the classic "gas...

Supernovae Used To Gauge The Power Of Cosmic Lenses
2014-05-02 06:38:10

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Two teams of astronomers have used the Hubble Space Telescope to observe distant exploding stars, and their research could help determine the power of naturally-occurring “cosmic lenses” than can be used to magnify objects in the far-off universe, NASA officials announced on Thursday. The scientists, who are working independently, have studied three supernovae using the phenomenon of gravitational lensing, which causes the...

Ganymede
2014-05-02 06:23:00

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online While astronomers have long believed that Jupiter’s moon Ganymede was home to a thick ocean sandwiched between two layers of ice, a new NASA-funded research project now claims that the largest natural satellite in our solar system could actually have several layers of ice and ocean stacked one upon another. Writing in the journal Planetary and Space Science, Steve Vance of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena,...

Magellan Telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory
2014-05-02 04:46:11

John P. Millis, Ph.D. for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In the normal course of evolution, galaxies initially formed stars as clouds of hydrogen and helium collapsed. Eventually the density and temperature of the cores would ignite nuclear fusion, allowing them to shine during what we call the main sequence phase of their lives. Eventually, stars will fuse heavier and heavier elements, with stars like our sun eventually culminating as balls of carbon and oxygen – in varying...

2014-05-01 16:37:05

Pfaff's Achievement Marks Second Year in a Row IO Has Won This Top Data Center Industry Honor PHOENIX, May 1, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- IO, a global leader in software-defined data centers, announced that Jason Pfaff, Vice President, North America DCaaS(TM) at IO, won the Data Center Manager of the Year Award from AFCOM, the leading association of data center and facilities management professionals. With this selection, AFCOM recognized Pfaff for outstanding leadership and excellence in...

2014-05-01 16:32:43

LA JOLLA, Calif., May 1, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Regulus Therapeutics Inc. (NASDAQ:RGLS), a biopharmaceutical company leading the discovery and development of innovative medicines targeting microRNAs, today announced that it will report financial results and highlights for the quarter ended March 31, 2014 on Thursday, May 8, 2014, after the U.S. financial markets close. Regulus will host a conference call and webcast on Thursday, May 8, 2014, at 5:00 pm Eastern Daylight Time to discuss...


Latest Astronomy Reference Libraries

Stellar Astrophysics
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The prominent feature that allows for the existence of life on Earth is the Sun. Radiation from our closest star provides heat and energy to our planet, driving biological processes and providing the necessary conditions for liquid water to naturally exist. But our Sun is only but one star in this vast Universe. And as it turns out, most stars are quite different than the one that illuminates our day. For this reason, scientists have, for hundreds of years, attempted to study the other...

Planetary Astronomy
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Image Caption: Artistic concept of a planetary system. Credit: Wikipedia/NASA/JPL-Caltech The term Astronomy encompasses a broad range of topics, including the study of stars, galaxies, and planets. In order to focus on the different areas of study, many subfields of astronomy emerge. One such area is the study of planets known, appropriately, as Planetary Astronomy. Observational Planetary Astronomy Even within the field of Planetary Astronomy, there are several divisions to...

Cosmology
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Image Caption: The Hubble Extreme Deep Field (XDF) was completed in September 2012 and shows the farthest galaxies ever photographed by humans. Each speck of light in the photo is an individual galaxy, some of them as old as 13.2 billion years; the observable universe is estimated to contain more than 200 billion galaxies. Credit: NASA/Wikipedia What is Cosmology? I once commented to an acquaintance that I was fascinated by the field of Cosmology, and mused that if I had more time, I...

Astrophysics
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Image Caption: NGC 4414, a typical spiral galaxy in the constellation Coma Berenices, is about 56,000 light-years in diameter and approximately 60 million light-years distant. Credit: NASA/ESA/Wikipedia What is Astrophysics? For much of the modern age the term Astrophysics has been used synonymously with Astronomy. This interchange is so common that many textbooks even offer the two as having the same meaning. However, from a strictly historical perspective there are differences...

Tropic of Capricorn
2013-02-21 13:31:57

The Tropic of Capricorn, alternately called the Southern Tropic, is a marker of the most southerly latitude on the Earth at which the Sun can be directly overhead. This occurs at the December solstice, when the southern hemisphere is tilted towards the sun at its maximum degree. It is one of the five major circles of latitude that mark maps of the Earth. It presently lies 23 degrees 26’ 16’’ south of the Equator. Currently, the Tropic of Capricorn is drifting towards the north at...

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Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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