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Latest Astrophysics Stories

NASA Firestation To Track Strange Things Produced By Thunderstorms
2013-09-11 12:32:12

[ Watch the Video: Firestation To Investigate Thunderstorm Tops ] Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new experiment aboard the International Space Station (ISS) is looking into the strange things that come from the tops of thunderstorms. The experiment, called "Firestation" consists of a package of sensors designed to explore how the Earth mimics a supernova during thunderstorms. About 50 times a second bolts of lightning heat up the air to a temperature five times...

Iron In The Sun
2013-09-06 08:00:37

AlphaGalileo Foundation Scientists from the Heidelberg Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (MPIK) in cooperation with DESY (Hamburg) at the synchrotron PETRA III have investigated for the first time X-ray absorption of highly charged iron ions. A transportable ion trap developed at MPIK was used for generation and storage of the ions. The high-precision measurements provide important new insight into the role of highly charged ions in astrophysical plasmas, e. g. for radiation...

Direction Change For Interstellar Winds
2013-09-06 04:15:08

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Data obtained through NASA's Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) project has revealed that neutral interstellar atoms are flowing into the solar system from a different direction than previously observed. That information has led scientists affiliated with the mission to believe that those particles, which flow past the Earth as the solar system passes through the surrounding interstellar cloud at speeds of 23 kilometers per...

Cosmic Rays Origins
2013-08-30 11:25:08

[ Listen To The redOrbit.com Podcast: The Mystery Of The Origins Of Cosmic Rays ] John P. Millis, PhD for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Streaming across the Universe are high-energy charged particles, known as cosmic rays. They move through space, interacting with our galactic magnetic field, deflecting in every possible direction. Eventually these fast-moving particles may impact the Earth’s atmosphere. For more than 100 years astronomers have been aware of their existence,...

NASA NuSTAR Telescope Showcases Unique X-Ray Images Of Space
2013-08-30 07:47:15

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online For the first time, NASA’s Nuclear Spetroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is giving the wider astronomical community a look at its unique X-ray images of the cosmos. NASA’s High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) made the first batch of data from the black-hole hunting telescope publicly available on August 29. "We are pleased to present the world with NuSTAR's first look at the sky in high-energy X-rays...

Modified Gravity Theory Predicts Galaxy Dynamics
2013-08-29 10:22:45

John P. Millis, PhD for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online For decades astronomers have studied the motions of galaxies – their rotations about their axes, as well as their interactions with each other – and been puzzled by what they have observed. The data suggests one of two possibilities: either these galaxies, and the space between them, contain significantly more mass than what is seen, or our physical understanding of gravity is flawed. The oft-discussed solution is that...

Milky Way Gas Cloud Creates Multiple Images Of Distant Quasar
2013-08-29 03:49:01

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Using the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescope system, astronomers have for the first time managed to capture an image of a distant quasar split into multiple images due to the effects of a cloud of ionized gas in the Milky Way. While these events were first predicted some four decades ago, the VLBA has managed to obtain the first evidence of their existence. Using the array, the...

Fermi Begins Extended Mission
2013-08-22 04:19:34

[ Watch the Video: Fermi at Five Years ] redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Having successfully completed its five-year primary mission, NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope entered the extended phase of its mission earlier this month – a deeper analysis of the high-energy cosmos that the US space agency hopes will continue through the year 2018. Fermi, which began the extended phase of its mission on August 11, has given astronomers an increasingly...

Zombie-Like Vortex Gives Final Push To Birth New Star
2013-08-21 14:06:17

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online For years, most astronomers have agreed on the basic steps that lead to star formation, except one – how a cloud of swirling gas can slow down enough to concentrate into something capable of nuclear fusion. A new study from the University of California, Berkeley has found evidence of “zombie vortices” within a gestating star leading to a final push that gives birth to a new star. According to prevailing theories, stars begin...


Latest Astrophysics Reference Libraries

Stellar Astrophysics
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The prominent feature that allows for the existence of life on Earth is the Sun. Radiation from our closest star provides heat and energy to our planet, driving biological processes and providing the necessary conditions for liquid water to naturally exist. But our Sun is only but one star in this vast Universe. And as it turns out, most stars are quite different than the one that illuminates our day. For this reason, scientists have, for hundreds of years, attempted to study the other...

Astrophysics
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Image Caption: NGC 4414, a typical spiral galaxy in the constellation Coma Berenices, is about 56,000 light-years in diameter and approximately 60 million light-years distant. Credit: NASA/ESA/Wikipedia What is Astrophysics? For much of the modern age the term Astrophysics has been used synonymously with Astronomy. This interchange is so common that many textbooks even offer the two as having the same meaning. However, from a strictly historical perspective there are differences...

How Solar Cycles Impact Our Weather Here On Earth
2013-01-13 09:10:34

Solar cycles: what are they and why should we care about them? Solar cycles are made up of what are known as solar minimums (min) and solar maximums (max). We refer to a solar min at the time when the sun is not active with many sunspots, while a solar max is just the opposite when we see a large increase in sunspot activity. So how long do solar cycles last? Typically they run on what is known as an 11 year cycle from the max to the min and then start over again anew. As of 2012 we...

Physics
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Physics is a natural science involving the study of matter and its motion through space-time, along with related concepts such as energy and force. On a broader scale, it also involves the general analysis of nature, conducted in order to understand how the universe behaves. Physics is one of the oldest academic disciplines, perhaps the oldest through its inclusion of astronomy. Physics was part of natural philosophy until the Scientific Revolution in the 16th century, when the natural...

Astronomy and Astrophysics Review
2012-04-25 09:55:47

The Astronomy and Astrophysics Review is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published quarterly by Springer Science Business Media. The editor-in-chief is Thierry Courvoisier. It was first published in April 1989. The journal covers all areas of astronomy and astrophysics, including cosmic ray physics, studies in the solar system, astrobiology, developments in laboratory or particle physics relevant to astronomy, instrumentation, computational or statistical methods with specific...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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