Quantcast
Last updated on April 18, 2014 at 21:21 EDT

Latest Atapuerca mountains Stories

Refining Dates For The Atapuerca Site Where Homo Antecessor Was Discovered
2014-02-10 09:43:28

FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology One of the issues of the Atapuerca sites that generates the most scientific debate is the dating of the strata where the fossils are found. Therefore, researchers at the Spanish National Research Centre for Human Evolution, among others, strive to settle the dates. A study published by the 'Journal of Archaeological Science' has clarified that the sediment of Gran Dolina, where the first remains of Homo antecessor were discovered in...

Scientists Find 800,000-Year-Old Human Footprints On Norfolk Beach
2014-02-07 13:51:03

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists have discovered the oldest human footprints ever found in Europe on a Norfolk beach. Archaeologists, publishing a paper in the journal PLOS ONE, say they found the footprints while working at an excavation site in Happisburgh, UK along the Norfolk coast. The team said the prints consist of about five individuals who lived more than 800,000 years ago. According to the study, these prints provide direct evidence of the...

Homo Heidelbergensis Slightly Taller Than The Neanderthal
2012-06-06 10:04:41

The reconstruction of 27 complete human limb bones found in Atapuerca (Burgos, Spain) has helped to determine the height of various species of the Pleistocene era. Homo heilderbergensis, like Neanderthals, were similar in height to the current population of the Mediterranean. Along with its enormous quantity of fossils, one of the most important features of the Sima de los Huesos (SH) site in Atapuerca, Burgos, is the splendid state of the findings. They are so well conserved that the 27...

c629ee35dd3b83c45bf4c73cea8122701
2011-04-20 09:16:43

Right-handedness is a distinctively human characteristic, with right-handers outnumbering lefties nine-to-one. But how far back does right-handedness reach in the human story? Researchers have tried to determine the answer by looking at ancient tools, prehistoric art and human bones, but the results have not been definitive. Now, David Frayer, professor of anthropology at the University of Kansas, has used markings on fossilized front teeth to show that right-handedness goes back more than...

fbbbf994b18ec7f717efa79f9815dc55
2010-10-12 12:45:00

New evidence released Monday suggests cave dwellers who lived in northern Spain around 500,000 years ago actually took care of their elderly. The University of Madrid paleontologists discovered the partial male skeleton from a European species ancestral to the Neanderthals who suffered from a stoop and possibly needed a stick to remain upright. "This individual would be probably impaired for hunting, among other activities. His survival during a considerable period with these...

00ce305840099671af32e7a1e28ca9ff1
2010-01-07 15:45:00

The earliest known domestic horses are around 4,600 years old. They were originated in the steppes between modern Ukraine and Kazakhstan. Using this evidence, two different hypotheses have been suggested: 1) domestic horses spread from this area over the rest of Eurasia; 2) horse domestication was a multiregional process, having occurred several times in different local places. "Previous analysis on mitochondrial DNA from modern Iberian horses pointed to the D1 haplogroup as the most likely...

0e21181a0296e73192d46012de84cd791
2008-03-27 01:05:00

Recent findings show evidence that humans lived in Europe up to 1.2 million years ago, about 400,000 years more than was previously estimated. The jawbone discovered at the archaeological site of Atapuerca, now part of modern-day Spain, represents that of the oldest known human inhabitants of Europe. Along with the jawbone, they found teeth and basic tools in the cave near the city of Burgos. The bone's small size indicates that it could have belonged to a female. The caves of Sierre de...

2007-11-11 03:00:10

By Fagan, Brian Archaeology continues to be an irresistible lure to publishers, broadcasters and the general public. And the last fifteen years have seen an extraordinary number of spectacular finds across the globe and equally spectacular revelations from ever more sophisticated lab techniques. Brian Fagan, who has taught archaeology since the 1960s, reviews the brave new world of modern archaeological discovery. THE TERRACOTTA ARMY, the royal tombs of Ur, and Olduvai Gorge's Zinjanthropus...

2004-11-28 03:00:21

THIS SURVEY OF THE EVIDENCE TOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF DOMESTIC FIRE and home bases integrates naturalistic factors and culture historical stages and processes into an anthropological theoretical framework. The main focus will be to review fire technology in terms of (1) its characteristics in prehistoric times and its earliest established evidence; (2) the role it played, among other factors, in the appearance of ancient hominid home bases sensu stricto; as part of a key formative stage during...