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Latest Atomic physics Stories

2012-06-05 11:31:01

Physicists from the University of Bonn split an atom using quantum mechanics precision Researchers from the University of Bonn have just shown how a single atom can be split into its two halves, pulled apart and put back together again. While the word "atom" literally means "indivisible," the laws of quantum mechanics allow dividing atoms - similarly to light rays - and reuniting them. The researchers want to build quantum mechanics bridges by letting the atom touch adjacent atoms while it...

2012-05-15 21:16:24

Kansas State University physicists and an international team of collaborators have made a breakthrough that improves understanding of matter-light interactions. Their research allows double ionization events to be observed at the time scale of attoseconds, which are one-billionth of a billionth of a second. The physicists have also shown that these ionization events occur earlier than thought -- a key factor to improving knowledge of correlated electron dynamics, which involve two...

2012-05-15 13:16:51

A strong laser beam can remove an electron from an atom — a process which takes place almost instantly. At the Vienna University of Technology, this phenomenon could now be studied with a time resolution of less than ten attoseconds (ten billionths of a billionth of a second). Scientists succeeded in watching an atom being ionized and a free electron being "born". These measurements yield valuable information about the electrons in the atom, which up until now hasn't been experimentally...

New Technique Efficiently Creates Single Photons For Quantum Information Processing
2012-04-23 04:48:52

Atomic blockade Using lasers to excite just one atom from a cloud of ultra-cold rubidium gas, physicists have developed a new way to rapidly and efficiently create single photons for potential use in optical quantum information processing — and in the study of dynamics and disorder in certain physical systems. The technique takes advantage of the unique properties of atoms that have one or more electrons excited to a condition of near-ionization known as the Rydberg state. Atoms...

Image 1 - Ultracold Experiments Heat Up Quantum Research
2012-03-21 04:17:04

University of Chicago physicists have experimentally demonstrated, for the first time, that atoms chilled to temperatures near absolute zero may behave like seemingly unrelated natural systems of vastly different scales, offering potential insights into links between the atomic realm and deep questions of cosmology. This ultracold state, called “quantum criticality,” hints at similarities between such diverse phenomena as the gravitational dynamics of black holes or the exotic...

2012-02-29 10:29:42

How long does it take an electron to form a photon? The answer would normally be: so short a time that it cannot be measured. However, the international CERN team responsible for experiment NA63 — mainly staffed by physicists from Aarhus University — has now succeeded in dragging out the process, thereby making it measurable. They achieved this by utilizing the phenomena of objects moving slower and shortening in length from Einstein´s theory of relativity, along with two...

2012-02-20 11:46:05

AAAS presentation: Charles Clark Just as NASA engineers test new rocket designs in computer studies before committing themselves to full prototypes, so physicists will often model matter under various circumstances to see whether something new appears. This is especially true of atomtronics, a relatively new science devoted to creating artificial tailored materials consisting of neutral atoms held in an array with laser beams, or atoms moving along a desired track under electric or...

Physicists Mimic Jupiter's Trojan Asteroids Inside Single Atom
2012-01-25 04:06:50

[ Watch the Video ] Orbit of captured electron matches orbit of Jupiter's captured asteroids Rice University physicists have gone to extremes to prove that Isaac Newton's classical laws of motion can apply in the atomic world: They've built an accurate model of part of the solar system inside a single atom of potassium. In a new paper published this week in Physical Review Letters, Rice's team and collaborators at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Vienna University of...

2012-01-23 13:26:12

Physicists at the University of New South Wales have observed a new kind of interaction that can arise between electrons in a single-atom silicon transistor. The findings, to be published this week in the journal Physical Review Letters, offer a more complete understanding of the mechanisms for electron transport in nanostructures at the atomic level. "We have been able to study some of the most complicated transport mechanisms that can arise up to the single atom level," says lead...

2012-01-23 10:57:31

Researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute have combined two worlds — quantum physics and nano physics, and this has led to the discovery of a new method for laser cooling semiconductor membranes. Semiconductors are vital components in solar cells, LEDs and many other electronics, and the efficient cooling of components is important for future quantum computers and ultrasensitive sensors. The new cooling method works quite paradoxically by heating the material! Using lasers, researchers...


Latest Atomic physics Reference Libraries

14_02a81429ca6e2c6ea21ddae4bf461d1b
2013-03-16 00:00:00

Niels Henrik David Bohr (October 7, 1885 - November 18, 1962) was a Danish physicist. He made essential contributions to understanding atom structure and quantum mechanics. Born in Copenhagen, Denmark to Christian Bohr and Ellen Adler, Bohr got his doctorate at Copenhagen University in 1911. He then studied under Ernest Rutherford in Manchester, England. Based on Rutherford's theories, Bohr published his Bohr model about atom structure in 1913, introducing the theory of electrons...

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Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
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