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Latest Atomic physics Stories

2009-10-22 14:49:26

Investigating mysterious data in ultracold gases of rubidium atoms, scientists at the Joint Quantum Institute of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland and their collaborators have found that properly tuned radio-frequency waves can influence how much the atoms attract or repel one another, opening up new ways to control their interactions. As the authors report* in an upcoming issue of Physical Review A, the radio-frequency (RF) radiation...

2009-09-28 07:39:59

Rather than reducing disorder, physicists find a way to simply move it somewhere else Physicists are continually reaching new lows as they reduce the temperatures of samples in their laboratories. But even nano-kelvins are not low enough to overcome the entropy (a measure of the disorder in a system) that stands between them and the discovery of exotic states of ultra-cold matter. Now physicists at two Italian universities have developed a technique that siphons entropy out of a collection of...

2009-09-03 23:30:00

Realization of an excited, strongly correlated many-body phase Hanns-Christoph Naegerl's research group has investigated how ultracold quantum gases behave in lower spatial dimensions. They successfully realized an exotic state, where, due to the laws of quantum mechanics, atoms align along a one-dimensional structure. A stable many-body phase with new quantum mechanical states is thereby produced even though the atoms are usually strongly attracted which would cause the system to collapse....

2009-09-02 14:48:43

First evidence that a method proposed 3 decades ago really works In their experiment the scientists tested a completely new principle of cooling. For this, they used the property that atoms can be stimulated by light. In this process an electron changes from its orbit around the atom's nucleus to an orbit that is further away. However, this is only successful if the incoming light has the appropriate color. Red light has less energy than blue light. Therefore the 'push' which a red laser...

2009-06-30 16:52:32

U.S. physicists say they have discovered giant Rydberg atom molecules with a bond as large as a red blood cell. The University of Oklahoma researchers led by Professor James Shaffer said determining how Rydberg molecules interact is important because Rydberg atoms are a key ingredient in atom based quantum computation schemes. The scientists said giant Rydberg molecules are formed when two Rydberg atoms interact. A Rydberg atom is an atom that has at least one electron orbiting the nucleus at...

2009-06-24 12:56:47

Physicists have found a way to drastically prolong the shelf life of quantum bits, the 0s and 1s of quantum computers.These precarious bits, formed in this case by arrays of semiconductor quantum dots containing a single extra electron, are easily perturbed by magnetic field fluctuations from the nuclei of the atoms creating the quantum dot. This perturbation causes the bits to essentially forget the piece of information they were tasked with storing.A quantum dot is a semiconductor...

2009-06-24 11:09:48

A group of University of Oklahoma researchers led by Dr. James P. Shaffer, Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, have discovered giant Rydberg molecules with a bond as large as a red blood cell. Determining how Rydberg molecules interact is important because Rydberg atoms are a key ingredient in atom based quantum computation schemes. Giant Rydberg molecules are formed when two Rydberg atoms interact. A Rydberg atom is an atom that has at least one electron orbiting the nucleus...

2009-06-17 16:01:42

U.S. scientists have discovered a magnetic superatom that might one day be used to create molecular electronic devices for future computers. Virginia Commonwealth University researchers said the superatom consists of a stable cluster of atoms that can mimic different elements of the periodic table. The cluster, consisting of one vanadium and eight cesium atoms, acts as a tiny magnet that can mimic a single manganese atom in magnetic strength, while preferentially allowing electrons of...

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2009-05-21 07:37:27

Researchers have figured out how to nullify collision effects and make the clock still more precise To accurately measure tiny intervals of time, you need a clock that ticks very fast and very precisely. For the ultimate in accuracy, scientists reach for atoms, or more precisely, an exactly known frequency of light emitted by a chosen atom. The 'ticks' are the crests of a light wave, which rises and falls as many as a thousand trillion times per second. In an effort to improve the already...

2009-04-23 16:33:44

German-led scientists say they have observed for the first time a rare molecule, the existence of which has until now only been predicted by theory. The researchers from the University of Stuttgart and the University of Oklahoma told the BBC the so-called Rydberg molecule was theorized to form when one of its two atoms has an electron orbiting at an extreme distance from the atom's nucleus. First predicted by physicist Chris Greene of the University of Colorado, the existence of the Rydberg...


Latest Atomic physics Reference Libraries

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2013-03-16 00:00:00

Niels Henrik David Bohr (October 7, 1885 - November 18, 1962) was a Danish physicist. He made essential contributions to understanding atom structure and quantum mechanics. Born in Copenhagen, Denmark to Christian Bohr and Ellen Adler, Bohr got his doctorate at Copenhagen University in 1911. He then studied under Ernest Rutherford in Manchester, England. Based on Rutherford's theories, Bohr published his Bohr model about atom structure in 1913, introducing the theory of electrons...

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Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
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