Quantcast

Latest Australian Institute of Marine Science Stories

Great Barrier Reef Is Shrinking
2012-10-02 07:58:43

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The Great Barrier Reef in Australia is the world's largest coral reef, and the only living thing on Earth that is visible from space. The Great Barrier Reef is approximately 3000 kilometers long and up to 65 kilometers wide in some places. According to new research from the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS ), the Great Barrier Reef has lost half of its coral cover in the last 27 years. The research team attributes this...

2012-08-02 16:45:33

Widespread skin cancer has been identified for the first time in wild marine fish populations, new research has shown. A collaborative study between Newcastle University, UK, and the Australian Institute of Marine Science published today in the academic journal PLoS ONE - reveals the incidence of melanoma in the coral trout, a species found on the Great Barrier Reef and directly beneath the world's largest hole in the ozone layer. This is the first time skin cancer has been diagnosed in...

2012-05-08 10:50:05

Jobs, livelihoods and ecotourism industries can benefit from having a diverse supply of weed-eating fish on the world´s coral reefs, marine researchers say. Despite their small size, relative to the sharks, whales, and turtles that often get more attention, herbivorous fish play a vital role in maintaining the health of coral reefs, which support the livelihoods of 500 million people worldwide, say researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook...

2012-01-20 11:45:08

Recent experiments conducted at the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) produced striking results, showing for the first time that corals hosting a single type of “zooxanthellae” can have different levels of thermal tolerance — a feature that was only known previously for corals with a mix of zooxanthellae. Zooxanthellae are algal cells that live within the tissue of living coral and provide the coral host with energy; the relationship is crucial for the...

645c7403cd832d057678725a7c096343
2011-05-02 14:20:00

According to a new study released Monday by researchers in Australia, a single reef shark can be worth about two million dollars in tourism revenue over its lifetime. The analysis from the Pacific island nation of Palau shows that sharks are worth many times more to local economics alive than dead. "Sharks can literally be a 'million-dollar' species and a significant economic driver," said lead author Mark Meekan, a scientist at the Australian Institute of Marine Science. "Our study shows...

a935cd530eb9e5809aba0d91a83e5ffb
2010-07-06 10:52:40

At first glance it may seem like a good idea to be a fish living the quiet life on a small and isolated reef. But a team of researchers has found that the opposite is the case on Australia's Great Barrier Reef. Using 15 years of long-term monitoring data collected from 43 reefs by the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS), the researchers from AIMS and the University of Adelaide have found that fish living on small, isolated reefs face a greater risk of local extinction. The results...

2501fbf05644e591dda7023f3dfc0c66
2009-01-02 13:35:00

Scientists said on Thursday that coral growth in Australia's Great Barrier Reef has fallen to its lowest rate for 400 years, in a troubling sign for the world's oceans. Glen De'ath and colleagues at the Australian Institute of Marine Science believe the slow growth could threaten a variety of marine ecosystems that rely on the reef and signal similar problems for other similar organisms worldwide. The Great Barrier Reef is the largest coral bed in the world, composed of over 2,900 individual...

62eb4e10b097e36eb8071b38a66d140d1
2008-11-17 14:25:00

A marine biology crew has managed to record a whale shark - the world's biggest fish - expelling food waste, which was then scooped up for research. The sample has helped us discover more about the giant creature's feeding habits, said biologist Mark Meekan. The footage will be available as part of a BBC Natural World wildlife program called, "Whale Shark". Closely related to great whites, the whale shark (Rhincodon typus) is far less fearsome as they are only filter feeders, swimming with...

b55f7d8bff4973d35bbd701a512331cc
2008-10-01 10:48:29

The roadmap to the future of the gorgeously-decorated fish which throng Australia's coral reefs and help earn the nation $5 billion a year from tourism may well be written in their genes. Of particular importance may be to protect "Ëœpioneer' fish populations which are able to re-colonize regions of reef devastated by global warming and other impacts or settle new areas as the corals move south, says Dr Line Bay of the ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies, James Cook...

4ff50077730384674b1cdbbb63b3c7081
2008-07-21 14:20:00

No-take marine reserves where fishing is banned can have benefits that extend beyond the exploited fishes they are specifically designed to protect, according to new evidence from Australia's Great Barrier Reef reported in the July 22nd issue of Current Biology, a Cell Press publication. Researchers have found that outbreaks of large, predatory crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci), which can devastate coral reefs, occur less often in protected zones, although they don't yet know...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
Related