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Latest Australopithecus afarensis Stories

new human species
2015-05-28 09:30:51

An international team of researchers working in Ethiopia has uncovered fossil remains of a new species of ancient human, according to a new report in the journal Nature.

Humanlike Features Discovered In 4.4M-Year-Old Ardipithecus Skull
2014-01-07 06:54:22

The 4.4 million-year-old African species Ardipithecus ramidus, or "Ardi," is the focus of one of the most hotly debated issues in current human origins research. Scientists want to know how Ardi, an unusual primate, is related to human lineage.

Early Human Ancestors May Have Walked And Climbed Trees
2013-01-01 09:48:25

Many researchers believe that one of the pivotal events in becoming human was the development of terrestrial bipedalism, or the ability to walk on two legs.

Ancient Lucy Spent Some Of Her Time In Trees
2012-10-26 06:23:53

The most comprehensive analysis to date of Australopithecus afarensis shoulder blades indicates a partially arboreal lifestyle.

A Different Tale Of Snake Evolution
2012-07-27 05:24:35

New analysis of what is being called one of the most primitive snake fossils ever discovered suggests that the reptilian creatures may have developed their unique look on land, not in water.

2012-04-02 11:13:48

It seems that “Lucy” was not the only hominin on the block in northern Africa about 3 million years ago.

2012-03-29 11:32:13

A team of scientists has announced the discovery of a 3.4 million-year-old partial foot from the Woranso-Mille area of the Afar region of Ethiopia.

139524037
2012-03-29 07:08:23

A 3.4-million-year-old fossil foot found in eastern Ethiopia appears to settle a long-standing debate about whether there was just one line of hominins 3 to 4 million years ago, scientists said on Wednesday.

2012-02-21 08:00:00

The Sciences Magazine EurekaMag.com publishes reviews of specific subjects of all areas of natural science.


Word of the Day
begunk
  • To befool; deceive; balk; jilt.
  • An illusion; a trick; a cheat.
The word 'begunk' may come from a nasalised variant of Scots begeck ("to deceive, disappoint"), equivalent to be- +‎ geck.