Quantcast

Latest AutoPulse Stories

2013-11-18 20:50:51

Sten Rubertsson, M.D., Ph.D., of Uppsala University, Sweden and colleagues assessed whether cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in which chest compressions are delivered with a mechanical device would result in superior 4-hour survival in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest compared to CPR with manual chest compression. "Many factors affect the chances of survival after cardiac arrest, including early recognition of arrest, effective CPR and defibrillation, and postresuscitation...

cpr
2013-09-03 07:22:27

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study from Uppsala University and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) shows that mechanical chest compressions are as equally effective as manual CPR. The LINC study, published in the journal Resuscitation, included 2,589 patients from six European sites who had suffered an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and needed resuscitation. "The study was designed to show a better 4-hour survival in the group treated with mechanical...

2013-01-22 13:38:22

CHOP experts are co-authors of 2 large studies of outcomes after in-hospital cardiac arrest Experts from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia were among the leaders of two large national studies showing that extending CPR longer than previously thought useful saves lives in both children and adults. The research teams analyzed impact of duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients who suffered cardiac arrest while hospitalized. "These findings about the duration of CPR are...

2011-01-20 07:50:36

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- A new way to perform cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) increases out-of-hospital survival from cardiac arrest by 53-percent, according to a new study. About 800,000 people in the United States, Canada and Europe suffer an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest event each year. The survival rate is about 5 percent for these patients. Researchers, led by Dr. Tom P. Aufderheide, professor of medicine at the University of Wisconsin, studied 813 patients who received standard CPR...

2011-01-19 14:04:40

A study led by Dr. Tom P. Aufderheide, professor of emergency medicine at The Medical College of Wisconsin, shows an alternative method of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation increases long-term survival of patients. The study, which is published in the January 19th, 2011 online version of Lancet, and will be in an upcoming publication of Lancet, determined that active compression-decompression cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with augmentation of negative intrathoracic pressure gave patients...

2011-01-19 09:53:00

ROSEVILLE, Minn., Jan. 19, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- A combination of two devices could save the lives of thousands of cardiac arrest patients each year if implemented nationwide, suggests clinical trial results published in today's online edition of The Lancet. A significantly higher percentage of patients who experienced out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survived after receiving active compression decompression cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ACD CPR) performed with the...

2010-11-15 09:38:00

CHICAGO, Nov. 15, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- A combination of two devices could save the lives of several thousand cardiac arrest patients each year if implemented nationwide, suggests results of a clinical trial presented at today's American Heart Association Resuscitation Science Symposium. A significantly higher percentage of patients who experienced out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survived after receiving active compression decompression cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ACD CPR) performed with...

2010-10-20 08:21:04

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- More pushing, less breathing : that's the new slogan from life-saving experts regarding CPR.  A new study shows a higher survival rate if CPR is only done with chest compressions and not mouth-to-mouth. The authors of the study reviewed existing evidence regarding CPR with chest compressions only. They compared the findings with standard CPR evidence in a meta-analysis. In the first meta-analysis, they included trials in which patients were randomly allocated to...


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
Related