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Latest Auxin Stories

2011-10-12 10:44:49

2,4-D is coming back. What many might consider a "dinosaur" may be the best solution for growers fighting weed resistance today, said Dean Riechers, University of Illinois associate professor of weed physiology. "Farmers can't imagine going back to 2,4-D or other auxin herbicides," Riechers said. "But herbicide resistance is bad enough that companies are willing to bring it back. That illustrates how severe this problem is." In a recently published article in Weed Science, Riechers and...

2011-04-18 16:42:38

A mechanism for stabilizing the development of the plant organism During the development of organisms, a particular event repeatedly occurs: a signal appears temporarily, but the processes it triggers must be maintained "“ for example, when the fate of cells in the embryo is established. The plant hormone auxin plays an important role as a signaling molecule during embryo development of the thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana), a model plant widely used in genetic studies. Researchers...

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2011-01-18 09:48:16

Plants are fundamental to life on Earth, converting light and carbon dioxide into food and oxygen. Plant growth may be an important part of human survival in exploring space, as well. Gardening in space has been part of the International Space Station from the beginning -- whether peas grown in the Lada greenhouse or experiments in the Biomass Production System. The space station offers unique opportunities to study plant growth and gravity, something that cannot be done on Earth. The latest...

2010-09-03 12:05:00

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C., Sept. 3 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- As fat summer tomatoes dangle in profusion from vines in gardens and farms across the country, researchers at Wake Forest University are looking for a way to make future harvests hold up better against drought or lack of nutrients. But the tomatoes these researchers study, with names like Never Ripe and Green Ripe, are mutants that will never achieve that wonderful red that makes a perfect summer meal for many foodies. That's because...

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2010-06-25 07:47:26

The two most important growth hormones of plants, so far considered antagonists, also work synergistically. The activities of auxin and cytokinin, key molecules for plant growth and the formation of organs, such as leaves and buds, are in fact more closely interwoven than previously assumed. Scientists from Heidelberg, Tbingen (Germany) and Umea (Sweden) made this surprising discovery in a series of complex experiments using thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana), a biological reference organism....

2010-06-15 00:51:14

New research published by Cell Press in the June 15th issue of the journal Developmental Cell, reveals how plants modify their root architecture based on nutrient availability in the soil. Plants obtain most necessary nutrients by taking them up from the soil into their roots. Although plants cannot move to a new environment when nutrient availability is less than favorable, they can modify their development to favor root colonization of soil areas where nutrients are abundant. Therefore,...

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2010-05-17 13:40:58

Between shoot and root, TAU unlocks a new tool for the biofuel industry Plant geneticists are on a determined quest "” to control auxin, a powerful plant growth hormone. Auxin tells plants how to grow, where to lay down roots, how to make tissues, and how to respond to light and gravity. Knowing how to manipulate auxin could thus have enormous implications for the production of biofuel, making plants grow faster and better. A recent publication in the journal PLoS Biology from the...

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2010-05-07 09:24:31

People aren't the only living things that suffer from stress. Trees must deal with stress too. It can come from a lack of water or too much water, from scarcity of a needed nutrient, from pollution or a changing climate. Helping trees and crops adapt to stress quickly and efficiently is a pressing goal of plant biologists worldwide. Now research led by Michigan Technological University scientists has identified the molecular mechanism that Populus"”the scientific name for common...

2010-04-01 13:40:00

Plants respond to attacks by herbivores or pathogens by activating defense programs that drive off or even kill the attackers. These defense responses require a great deal of the plant's energy and reserves, which would otherwise be invested in growth and reproduction. So, it's very important to strictly control the activity of defense genes. Hormones, such as the jasmonates, are crucial in this process "“ and the plant produces these hormones when subjected to stress conditions. The...

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2010-03-15 13:20:12

Tbingen-based developmental geneticists research organ development in the plant embryo In the beginning is the fertilized egg cell. Following numerous cell divisions, it then develops into a complex organism with different organs and tissues. The largely unexplained process whereby the cells simply "know" the organs into which they should later develop is an astonishing phenomenon. Scientists from the Center for Plant Molecular Biology (ZMBP) of the University of Tbingen and the University of...


Latest Auxin Reference Libraries

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2011-04-14 14:17:06

Agrobacterium tumefaciens is the causal agent of crown gall disease (the formation of tumours) in over 140 species of dicot. It is rod shaped. Symptoms are caused by the insertion of a small segment of DNA into the plant cell. It is an alphaproteobacterium of the family Rhizobiaceae which includes the nitrogen fixing legume symbionts. They are pathogenic and provide no benefit to the plant. It also affects a wide variety of plants. In an economical sense it affects walnuts, grape vines,...

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Word of the Day
penuche
  • A fudgelike confection of brown sugar, cream or milk, and chopped nuts.
'Penuche' is a variant of 'panocha,' a coarse grade of sugar made in Mexico. 'Panocha' probably comes from the Spanish 'panoja, panocha,' ear of grain.
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