Quantcast

Latest Avian malaria Stories

Climate Change Allows Malaria To Reach New Heights
2014-03-07 05:27:57

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Scientists from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and the University of Michigan have discovered the first concrete evidence that the mosquito-borne disease malaria travels to higher elevations during warmer years and returns to lower altitudes when temperatures become cooler. In research appearing in the March 7 edition of Science, the study authors reviewed records from the highland regions of Colombia and...

Northern Spread Of Avian Malaria In Alaska Fueled By Climate Change
2012-09-20 10:40:27

Researchers discover infected birds in Alaska, say global warming will send disease farther north Malaria has been found in birds in parts of Alaska, and global climate change will drive it even farther north, according to a new study published today in the journal PLOS ONE. The spread could prove devastating to arctic bird species that have never encountered the disease and thus have no resistance to it, said San Francisco State University Associate Professor of Biology Ravinder...

2012-07-18 12:39:38

Scientists from the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) are the first to document the characteristics of invading parasites, using malaria in New Zealand bird species. The study, published today in Ecology Letters, identifies the factors influencing the success of parasites unintentionally introduced to new environments. Avian malaria is a disease caused by species of parasites, of the genus Plasmodium, which infects birds. Just like human malaria, it is spread by mosquitoes, and the...

Only Few Seabird Species Contract Avian Malaria
2011-12-13 04:02:07

Climate differences have less impact on the transmission of blood parasites than expected Seabirds often live in large colonies in very confined spaces. Parasites, such as fleas and ticks, take advantage of this ideal habitat with its rich supply of nutrition. As a result, they can transmit blood parasites like avian malaria to the birds. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Radolfzell and a team of international colleagues have investigated whether this affects all...

2011-11-08 21:48:21

The Wildlife Society's annual conference is from Nov. 5 to 10 on Waikoloa (the Big Island), Hawaii. USGS scientists are heavily involved in the conference´s sessions, workshops and talks. Said USGS Director Marcia McNutt, "USGS science being presented at TWS is key to helping managers and policymakers make informed. balanced and cost-effective decisions about natural resources that have economic, social, ecological and cultural importance to multiple stakeholder communities." The...

2009-08-12 12:49:31

Mosquitoes with the potential to carry diseases lethal to many unique species of Galapagos wildlife are being regularly introduced to the islands via aircraft, according to new research published today.The southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus, was previously thought to have been introduced to the Galapagos in a one-off event in the mid-1980s.However, scientists from the University of Leeds, the Zoological Society of London (ZSL), the University of Guayaquil, the Galapagos National...

2009-08-12 09:07:50

Scientists say mosquitoes that might be carrying diseases lethal to many species of Galapagos Islands wildlife are being brought to the islands by aircraft. Researchers from the University of Leeds, the Zoological Society of London, the University of Guayaquil, the Galapagos National Park and the Charles Darwin Foundation said the mosquitoes are also being transported from island to island on tourist boats. Arnaud Bataille, a Leeds doctoral student who led the study, said on average the...

20ecd3a888b6739c2b7b2e450c02228b1
2009-08-12 11:00:00

Disease carrying mosquitoes that are being carried over with tourists are posing a great threat to the unique wildlife of the Galapagos Islands, researchers said on Wednesday. Experts have reason to fear that the spread of the southern house mosquito (Culex quinquefasciatus) could have the same devastating impact on the ecology of the Galapagos as it did in Hawaii during the late 19th century, when disease killed off many indigenous birds. First noticed in the Galapagos in the mid-1980s, the...

ee4cc3b324c7bf42356463ecf34291e91
2009-05-26 13:18:49

Deadly Diseases May Move Up Hawaiian Mountains to Birds' Refuges As climate change causes temperatures to increase in Hawaii's mountains, deadly non-native bird diseases will likely also creep up the mountains, invading most of the last disease-free refuges for honeycreepers "“ a group of endangered and remarkable birds. A just-published U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) review discusses the likelihood of a forthcoming "disease invasion" by examining the present altitudinal range of avian...

9dea45217289fa4ded1d1cbcd45b62551
2008-08-21 06:15:00

By Erica Gies A parasite has been found in Galapagos penguins, raising fears among researchers that it could lead to avian malaria, a disease that contributed significantly to the 50 percent extinction rate of endemic birds in Hawaii. The discovery resulted from a long-term study to monitor diseases in Galapagos birds, conducted by researchers from the University of Missouri, St. Louis, the St. Louis Zoo, Galapagos National Park, and the Charles Darwin Foundation. Unlike Hawaii and other...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
Related